What do FAA regulations say about who can certify for maintenance on a FAA registered aircraft when it is overseas?

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alanjupp49
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What do FAA regulations say about who can certify for maintenance on a FAA registered aircraft when it is overseas?

What do FAA regulations say about who can certify for maintenance on a FAA registered aircraft when it is overseas?

Is there a global (ICAO) position on this?

 

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bob.pasch
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Your answer is contained in 14CFR Part §43.17 Maintenance, preventive maintenance, and alterations performed on U.S. aeronautical products by certain Canadian persons. Other than that, the requirements are the same as if the aircraft was still in the U.S. per 14CFR §43.3 Persons authorized to perform maintenance, preventive maintenance, rebuilding, and alterations.

n14ky
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Bob is correct, Canada is the only country we have a bi-lateral agreement with that allows us to accept maintenace performed by non-US certified entities.

David

No Fly Zone (not verified)
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Ouch! That is a tough one. If I read the responses correctly, except in Canada, no non-U.S. A&P - or anything else - can repair U.S. registered aircraft. What to U.S. flag carriers (N-registrations) use for line maintenance in foreign ports? May they use only their own employees and maintenance operations pre-approved by FAA? This is probably not a problem in London, Tokyo or Frankfurt, but how do they deal with an aircraft that flunks the MEL list someplace in Outer Slobovia? At some point eve ferry permits have their limits. Is it necessary to fly-in U.S. licensed staff to make even simple repairs? What am I missing?

bob.pasch
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They use an FAA CRS or the JAA equivalent. Or, if they really are in Lower Slobovia, they do what they do if they were in Bumphuck, West Virginia, they fly someone in...

Bob nailed this one CFR 43.3 and 43.17 are pretty cut and dried rules that U.S. registered aircraft cannot get around. As for U.S. air carriers they are held the same rules in addition to part 119 and part 121 saying that those that work on their fleet aircraft have to be trained and qualified. This goes for the part 145 foreign repair stations and foreign mechanic that must hold a current FAA rating.

Here in Japan where I live and consult all the U.S major airlines require mechanic’s the maintain and service their fleet to obtain an FAA A&P rating within a certain time period. The line maintenance personnel here also require their mechanics to hold U.S. certificates and be training on the air carries procedures before they can sign of any maintenance.

When it comes to General Aviation aircraft the same rules apply you have to hold the U.S. mechanic rating unless per CFR 43.17. This is why many of the part 135 and 91 operators take an A&P with them on flights to cover their bases as part of the flight crew.

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