FAA & FAASTeam News

Subscribe to FAA & FAASTeam News feed
Updated: 7 min 5 sec ago

FAAST Blast — Week of May 14, 2018

Fri, 05/18/2018 - 10:11
 

FAA Safety Team | Safer Skies Through Education

FAAST Blast — FAA Safety Briefing Live, Best Glide Speed, AMT ACS Draft Now Available, Fresh Approach to Improving Runway Safety
Notice Number: NOTC7782

FAAST Blast — Week of May 14, 2018 – May 20, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

Watch FAA Safety Briefing Live
Did you miss the FAA Safety Briefing Live broadcast last week? No worries. Just go to http://www.faasafetybriefing.com/May-June.html to view an archived version of the broadcast. This edition introduces the May/June 2018 “Partnering with PEGASAS” issue, highlighting the FAA’s General Aviation Center of Excellence. You can also earn WINGS credit by completing a quiz after viewing the presentation. Just click the “Earn WINGS Credit” button in the presentation window.

Best Glide Speed and Distance
The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) has determined that a significant number of general aviation fatalities could be avoided if pilots were better informed and trained in determining and flying their aircraft at the best glide speed while maneuvering to complete a forced landing. Learn more about best glide speed by downloading our #FlySafe fact sheet here: http://bit.ly/2rfMV9p.

AMT Airman Certification Standards Draft Document Now Available
The FAA is in the process of replacing the Aviation Mechanic General, Airframe, and Powerplant Practical Test Standards (PTS) with a single, more comprehensive, Aviation Maintenance Technician (AMT) Airman Certification Standards (ACS) document. The ACS will help provide a single set of standards for the AMT knowledge, oral, and practical tests and help applicants understand what they will need to know, consider, and do to earn an AMT certificate with Airframe and Powerplant ratings. A draft of the new AMT ACS is available at www.faa.gov/training_testing/testing/acs/media/amt_acs.pdf. Please provide comments to afs630comments@faa.gov by May 31, 2018. The final version of the AMT ACS is expected to be effective June 2020.

Taking a Fresh Approach to Improving Runway Surfaces and Safety

The FAA and PEGASAS, the FAA’s General Aviation Center of Excellence, are exploring innovative and economical ways to improve our runway surfaces and safety. This partnership has researched ways to re-purpose safety features from other industries for use in aviation. Take for example rumble strips — we use them on our roadways, why not at our airports? To find out more about these fresh approaches to runway surface improvements and safety, check out the article, “Remote Sensors? Rumble Strips? Heated Pavements? Oh My!” in the March/April 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version at https://adobe.ly/2w8uYPE.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

 

field_vote: 0No votes yet
Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of April 30, 2018

Fri, 05/04/2018 - 11:11

FAAST Blast — FAA Safety Briefing Live, Best Glide Speed, NTSB LOC Roundtable, New PEGASUS Issue of Safety Briefing
Notice Number: NOTC7757

FAAST Blast — Week of April 30, 2018 – May 06, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

Watch FAA Safety Briefing Live!
The next FAA Safety Briefing Live is coming your way starting at 1900 CT on Monday, May 07, 2018. The live-streaming broadcast will introduce the May/June 2018 “Partnering with PEGASAS” issue, highlighting the FAA’s General Aviation Center of Excellence. For more details on how to access this presentation, go to https://www.faasafety.gov/SPANS/event_details.aspx?eid=82666. To earn WINGS credit for viewing the presentation, please click the “Earn WINGS Credit” button from within the presentation window.

Best Glide Speed
The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) has determined that a significant number of general aviation fatalities could be avoided if pilots were better informed and trained in determining and flying their aircraft at the best glide speed while maneuvering to complete a forced landing. #FlySafe and download our fact sheet at http://bit.ly/2rfMV9p for more info. You can also watch a video of the presentation at: https://youtu.be/dzK5xTAe2Z0.

NTSB Hosts Roundtable on Preventing Loss of Control

On April 24, the NTSB hosted an important roundtable discussion on ways to prevent loss of control accidents in GA. Attendees included several experts from the FAA, industry and academia who focused primarily on the role of training and technology in keeping GA safe. A webcast archive of the event is available for viewing for the next three months at http://ntsb.capitolconnection.org/.

Partnering with PEGASAS

The May/June 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on the FAA’s Center of Excellence for general aviation research, the Partnership for Enhancing General Aviation Safety, Accessibility, and Sustainability (PEGASAS). This partnership facilitates collaboration and coordination between government, academia, and industry to advance aviation technologies and expand FAA research capabilities. Feature articles in this issue focus on several of these forward thinking and safety enhancing projects. For a good primer on what PEGASAS is and how it operates, check out the article “Let it Flow! PEGASAS Inspires a River of Research.” Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version of the article at https://adobe.ly/2w40YED.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

field_vote: 0No votes yet
Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of April 30, 2018

Fri, 05/04/2018 - 11:11

FAAST Blast — FAA Safety Briefing Live, Best Glide Speed, NTSB LOC Roundtable, New PEGASUS Issue of Safety Briefing
Notice Number: NOTC7757

FAAST Blast — Week of April 30, 2018 – May 06, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

Watch FAA Safety Briefing Live!
The next FAA Safety Briefing Live is coming your way starting at 1900 CT on Monday, May 07, 2018. The live-streaming broadcast will introduce the May/June 2018 “Partnering with PEGASAS” issue, highlighting the FAA’s General Aviation Center of Excellence. For more details on how to access this presentation, go to https://www.faasafety.gov/SPANS/event_details.aspx?eid=82666. To earn WINGS credit for viewing the presentation, please click the “Earn WINGS Credit” button from within the presentation window.

Best Glide Speed
The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) has determined that a significant number of general aviation fatalities could be avoided if pilots were better informed and trained in determining and flying their aircraft at the best glide speed while maneuvering to complete a forced landing. #FlySafe and download our fact sheet at http://bit.ly/2rfMV9p for more info. You can also watch a video of the presentation at: https://youtu.be/dzK5xTAe2Z0.

NTSB Hosts Roundtable on Preventing Loss of Control

On April 24, the NTSB hosted an important roundtable discussion on ways to prevent loss of control accidents in GA. Attendees included several experts from the FAA, industry and academia who focused primarily on the role of training and technology in keeping GA safe. A webcast archive of the event is available for viewing for the next three months at http://ntsb.capitolconnection.org/.

Partnering with PEGASAS

The May/June 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on the FAA’s Center of Excellence for general aviation research, the Partnership for Enhancing General Aviation Safety, Accessibility, and Sustainability (PEGASAS). This partnership facilitates collaboration and coordination between government, academia, and industry to advance aviation technologies and expand FAA research capabilities. Feature articles in this issue focus on several of these forward thinking and safety enhancing projects. For a good primer on what PEGASAS is and how it operates, check out the article “Let it Flow! PEGASAS Inspires a River of Research.” Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version of the article at https://adobe.ly/2w40YED.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAA Safety Briefing May/June 2018

Thu, 05/03/2018 - 14:41
 

Your source for general aviation news and information

Read the Latest Issue!

The May/June 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on the FAA’s Center of Excellence for general aviation research, the Partnership for Enhancing General Aviation Safety, Accessibility, and Sustainability (PEGASAS). This partnership facilitates collaboration and coordination between government, academia, and industry to advance aviation technologies and expand FAA research capabilities. Feature articles in this issue focus on several of these forward thinking and safety enhancing projects.

Feature Stories

Click on headline below to read each mobile-friendly article online.

  Let it Flow! PEGASAS Inspires a River of Research

 

  Pushing the Envelope A Plan of “Attack” for Loss of Control

 

  Weather … Or Not? Weather Technology in the Cockpit

 

  LED There Be Light Working to Enhance Airport Lighting

 

  Remote Sensors? Rumble Strips? Heated Pavements? Oh My! 3 Fresh Approaches to Improve Runway Surfaces and Safety

 

  How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Singularity Using Collective Data to Drive Safety Improvement   Download Entire Magazine

PDF  |  EPUB  (for e-readers) |  MOBI (for Kindle)

 

Scroll up to the "Feature Stories" section to open each feature article in an easy-to-read online format.

    Subscribe/Contact: field_vote: 0No votes yet
Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAA Safety Briefing May/June 2018

Thu, 05/03/2018 - 14:41
 

Your source for general aviation news and information

Read the Latest Issue!

The May/June 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on the FAA’s Center of Excellence for general aviation research, the Partnership for Enhancing General Aviation Safety, Accessibility, and Sustainability (PEGASAS). This partnership facilitates collaboration and coordination between government, academia, and industry to advance aviation technologies and expand FAA research capabilities. Feature articles in this issue focus on several of these forward thinking and safety enhancing projects.

Feature Stories

Click on headline below to read each mobile-friendly article online.

  Let it Flow! PEGASAS Inspires a River of Research

 

  Pushing the Envelope A Plan of “Attack” for Loss of Control

 

  Weather … Or Not? Weather Technology in the Cockpit

 

  LED There Be Light Working to Enhance Airport Lighting

 

  Remote Sensors? Rumble Strips? Heated Pavements? Oh My! 3 Fresh Approaches to Improve Runway Surfaces and Safety

 

  How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Singularity Using Collective Data to Drive Safety Improvement   Download Entire Magazine

PDF  |  EPUB  (for e-readers) |  MOBI (for Kindle)

 

Scroll up to the "Feature Stories" section to open each feature article in an easy-to-read online format.

    Subscribe/Contact:
Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm

Thu, 04/05/2018 - 11:38

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm
Notice Number: NOTC7704

 

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm

We have a sense of humor, too, but an April Fool’s joke that the Federal Aviation Administration is extending the ADS-B deadline is just that.

As stated in the final rule published with industry input in May 2010, all aircraft flying in designated controlled airspace – generally the same busy airspace where transponders are currently required – must be equipped with ADS-B Out avionics by Jan. 1, 2020. Only aircraft that fly in uncontrolled airspace, and aircraft without electrical systems, such as balloons and gliders, are exempt from the mandate.

Those who have already equipped understand that ADS-B is transforming the nation’s airspace by providing more precision and reliability than the current radar system, enhancing safety and increasing situational awareness.

Time is running out. There are only 21 months left until the deadline. If you have any questions about equipage – whether you need to or not, what equipment to get, etc. – please see the FAA’s Equip ADS-B website. For information about the transformational technology, visit the ADS-B website.

field_vote: 0No votes yet
Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm

Thu, 04/05/2018 - 11:38

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm
Notice Number: NOTC7704

 

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm

We have a sense of humor, too, but an April Fool’s joke that the Federal Aviation Administration is extending the ADS-B deadline is just that.

As stated in the final rule published with industry input in May 2010, all aircraft flying in designated controlled airspace – generally the same busy airspace where transponders are currently required – must be equipped with ADS-B Out avionics by Jan. 1, 2020. Only aircraft that fly in uncontrolled airspace, and aircraft without electrical systems, such as balloons and gliders, are exempt from the mandate.

Those who have already equipped understand that ADS-B is transforming the nation’s airspace by providing more precision and reliability than the current radar system, enhancing safety and increasing situational awareness.

Time is running out. There are only 21 months left until the deadline. If you have any questions about equipage – whether you need to or not, what equipment to get, etc. – please see the FAA’s Equip ADS-B website. For information about the transformational technology, visit the ADS-B website.

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of April 2, 2018

Wed, 04/04/2018 - 15:58

FAAST Blast — AD Issued for Certain Bonanzas, Sun ‘n Fun 2018, How to Be a Weather Wingman
Notice Number: NOTC7703

FAAST Blast — Week of April 2, 2018 – April 8, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

FAA Issues AD for Certain Bonanza Airplanes
The FAA last week issued an AD for certain Textron Aviation A36TC, B36TC, S35, V35, V35A, and V35B airplanes. AD 2018-06-11 adds a life limit to the exhaust tailpipe v-band coupling (clamp) that attaches the exhaust tailpipe to the turbocharger and requires an annual visual inspection. The AD, which is effective May 3, 2018, affects 731 airplanes of U.S. registry. For more details, go to go.usa.gov/xQgfr

Sun ‘n Fun 2018
Get ready for some fun in the sun aviation style at this year’s Sun ’n Fun International Fly-In and Expo, scheduled to take place April 10-15, 2018, in Lakeland, Fla. The event features aerial performances, exhibits, and a wide variety of educational seminars (visit bit.ly/SnF18 for more information).

The FAA will also host a series of safety forums between 8:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. each day at the FAA Safety Team’s National Resource Center. NTSB Board Member Dr. Earl Weener will speak about loss of control accidents and the FAA’s General Aviation and Commercial Division Manager, Brad Palmer, will discuss the agency’s efforts to enhance GA safety. Other forum topics include wilderness survival, BasicMed, UAS regulations, and ADS-B equipage. For updates to the safety forum schedule, go to go.usa.gov/x9MZq. And if you’re planning to fly to Sun ’n Fun, don’t forget to read the 2018 Sun ’n Fun Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) available here or go to faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/notices.

How to Be a Weather Wingman

Pilots: What if we told you that you could help be a good cockpit companion even when you’re not in the same plane? Better yet, how about if you had the power to potentially help save a fellow pilot’s life — maybe several pilots — with a simple click of the mic? Find out how by reading the article “How to Be a Weather Wingman — Pay It Forward with PIREPs” in the March/April 2018 flying companion-themed issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version of this article at https://adobe.ly/2FBn459.  

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

field_vote: 0No votes yet
Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of April 2, 2018

Wed, 04/04/2018 - 15:58

FAAST Blast — AD Issued for Certain Bonanzas, Sun ‘n Fun 2018, How to Be a Weather Wingman
Notice Number: NOTC7703

FAAST Blast — Week of April 2, 2018 – April 8, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

FAA Issues AD for Certain Bonanza Airplanes
The FAA last week issued an AD for certain Textron Aviation A36TC, B36TC, S35, V35, V35A, and V35B airplanes. AD 2018-06-11 adds a life limit to the exhaust tailpipe v-band coupling (clamp) that attaches the exhaust tailpipe to the turbocharger and requires an annual visual inspection. The AD, which is effective May 3, 2018, affects 731 airplanes of U.S. registry. For more details, go to go.usa.gov/xQgfr

Sun ‘n Fun 2018
Get ready for some fun in the sun aviation style at this year’s Sun ’n Fun International Fly-In and Expo, scheduled to take place April 10-15, 2018, in Lakeland, Fla. The event features aerial performances, exhibits, and a wide variety of educational seminars (visit bit.ly/SnF18 for more information).

The FAA will also host a series of safety forums between 8:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. each day at the FAA Safety Team’s National Resource Center. NTSB Board Member Dr. Earl Weener will speak about loss of control accidents and the FAA’s General Aviation and Commercial Division Manager, Brad Palmer, will discuss the agency’s efforts to enhance GA safety. Other forum topics include wilderness survival, BasicMed, UAS regulations, and ADS-B equipage. For updates to the safety forum schedule, go to go.usa.gov/x9MZq. And if you’re planning to fly to Sun ’n Fun, don’t forget to read the 2018 Sun ’n Fun Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) available here or go to faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/notices.

How to Be a Weather Wingman

Pilots: What if we told you that you could help be a good cockpit companion even when you’re not in the same plane? Better yet, how about if you had the power to potentially help save a fellow pilot’s life — maybe several pilots — with a simple click of the mic? Find out how by reading the article “How to Be a Weather Wingman — Pay It Forward with PIREPs” in the March/April 2018 flying companion-themed issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version of this article at https://adobe.ly/2FBn459.  

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of Mar 5, 2018

Thu, 03/08/2018 - 09:45

FAAST Blast — LAANC Program Expanded, New Safety Briefing Live Broadcast Coming Soon, GA Survey, Flying Companions Issue
Notice Number: NOTC7656

FAAST Blast — Week of Mar 5, 2018 – Mar 11, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update
 

FAA Expands Drone Airspace Authorization Program
The FAA is expanding tests of an automated system that will ultimately provide near real-time processing of airspace authorization requests for unmanned aircraft (UAS) operators nationwide.

Under the FAA’s Part 107 small drone rule, operators must secure approval from the agency to operate in any airspace controlled by an air traffic facility. To facilitate those approvals, the agency deployed the prototype Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC) at several air traffic facilities last November to evaluate the feasibility of a fully automated solution enabled by data sharing. Based on the prototype’s success, the agency will now conduct a nationwide beta test beginning April 30 that will deploy LAANC incrementally at nearly 300 air traffic facilities covering approximately 500 airports. The final deployment will begin on September 13. For more information, read the FAA news release here: www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=89845.

Announcing New FAA Safety Briefing Live Broadcast

Mark your calendars now for FAA Safety Briefing Live, which is coming your way starting at 1900 CT on Monday, March 12, 2018. The inaugural, streaming broadcast will introduce the March/April 2018 “GA Flying Companions” issue, and include interviews with several special guests. It will also be eligible for WINGS credit. For more details on how to access this presentation, go to www.faasafety.gov/SPANS/event_details.aspx?eid=81571.

The GA and Part 135 Survey Has Been Cleared for Takeoff

Did you receive an email or postcard invitation asking you to complete the survey for your aircraft? The survey takes only 10-15 minutes and helps the FAA improve general aviation infrastructure and safety. Please complete the survey today online at www.aviationsurvey.org or contact us at 1-800-826-1797 or infoaviationsurvey@tetratech.com.

Flying Companions

The March/April 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on Flying Companions. Building on our previous companion-based edition in 2014, this issue is specifically designed for the friends and loved ones who join us in the air or might have an interest in doing so. Feature articles help regular or prospective passengers gain a better understanding of the world of general aviation and offer the tips, techniques, and resources needed to take a more active role during flight. Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

field_vote: 0No votes yet
Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of Mar 5, 2018

Thu, 03/08/2018 - 09:45

FAAST Blast — LAANC Program Expanded, New Safety Briefing Live Broadcast Coming Soon, GA Survey, Flying Companions Issue
Notice Number: NOTC7656

FAAST Blast — Week of Mar 5, 2018 – Mar 11, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update
 

FAA Expands Drone Airspace Authorization Program
The FAA is expanding tests of an automated system that will ultimately provide near real-time processing of airspace authorization requests for unmanned aircraft (UAS) operators nationwide.

Under the FAA’s Part 107 small drone rule, operators must secure approval from the agency to operate in any airspace controlled by an air traffic facility. To facilitate those approvals, the agency deployed the prototype Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC) at several air traffic facilities last November to evaluate the feasibility of a fully automated solution enabled by data sharing. Based on the prototype’s success, the agency will now conduct a nationwide beta test beginning April 30 that will deploy LAANC incrementally at nearly 300 air traffic facilities covering approximately 500 airports. The final deployment will begin on September 13. For more information, read the FAA news release here: www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=89845.

Announcing New FAA Safety Briefing Live Broadcast

Mark your calendars now for FAA Safety Briefing Live, which is coming your way starting at 1900 CT on Monday, March 12, 2018. The inaugural, streaming broadcast will introduce the March/April 2018 “GA Flying Companions” issue, and include interviews with several special guests. It will also be eligible for WINGS credit. For more details on how to access this presentation, go to www.faasafety.gov/SPANS/event_details.aspx?eid=81571.

The GA and Part 135 Survey Has Been Cleared for Takeoff

Did you receive an email or postcard invitation asking you to complete the survey for your aircraft? The survey takes only 10-15 minutes and helps the FAA improve general aviation infrastructure and safety. Please complete the survey today online at www.aviationsurvey.org or contact us at 1-800-826-1797 or infoaviationsurvey@tetratech.com.

Flying Companions

The March/April 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on Flying Companions. Building on our previous companion-based edition in 2014, this issue is specifically designed for the friends and loved ones who join us in the air or might have an interest in doing so. Feature articles help regular or prospective passengers gain a better understanding of the world of general aviation and offer the tips, techniques, and resources needed to take a more active role during flight. Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of Feb. 05, 2018

Fri, 02/09/2018 - 09:52

FAAST Blast – NPRM Issued for Textron Airplanes, Maintenance Placards, How to Talk Like a Pilot
Notice Number: NOTC7607

FAAST Blast — Week of Feb. 05, 2018 – Feb. 11, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update
 

NPRM Issued for Textron Aviation Airplanes

The FAA last week proposed to issue a new airworthiness directive (AD) that would affect certain (Cessna) Textron Aviation 172/182/206/207/210 airplanes. A report of cracks found in the lower area of the forward cabin doorpost bulkhead prompted this notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). This condition is determined to be the result of metal fatigue. If not addressed, it could lead to failure of the wing in operation, which could result in loss of control.

The AD would require repetitive inspection of this area for cracks and would require owners to make any necessary repairs in accordance with the applicable Cessna service kit. The FAA estimates that this proposed AD affects 14,653 airplanes of U.S. registry. For more details on the inspection and repair requirements of this NPRM, as well as instruction for submitting comments, go to https://go.usa.gov/xnsEA. The comment period closes on March 19, 2018.

Maintenance Placards

The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) has identified that attempting to fly in an aircraft currently undergoing maintenance, and not yet returned to service, is a causal factor in a number of fatal GA accidents. This month’s #FlySafe topic suggests adopting informal lock out/tag out procedures to ensure pilots are aware of un-airworthy aircraft conditions. See the fact sheet here: https://go.usa.gov/xnsPN.

How to Talk Like a Pilot

Pilots: How would you rate your aviation communication skills? Are you precise, yet concise? Courteous and classy? For important tips and techniques to improve your aviation lingo, have a look at the article, “How to Talk Like a Pilot” in the Jan/Feb 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at: 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can view a mobile-friendly version of this article at https://adobe.ly/2p7KwQb.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

field_vote: 0No votes yet
Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of Feb. 05, 2018

Fri, 02/09/2018 - 09:52

FAAST Blast – NPRM Issued for Textron Airplanes, Maintenance Placards, How to Talk Like a Pilot
Notice Number: NOTC7607

FAAST Blast — Week of Feb. 05, 2018 – Feb. 11, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update
 

NPRM Issued for Textron Aviation Airplanes

The FAA last week proposed to issue a new airworthiness directive (AD) that would affect certain (Cessna) Textron Aviation 172/182/206/207/210 airplanes. A report of cracks found in the lower area of the forward cabin doorpost bulkhead prompted this notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). This condition is determined to be the result of metal fatigue. If not addressed, it could lead to failure of the wing in operation, which could result in loss of control.

The AD would require repetitive inspection of this area for cracks and would require owners to make any necessary repairs in accordance with the applicable Cessna service kit. The FAA estimates that this proposed AD affects 14,653 airplanes of U.S. registry. For more details on the inspection and repair requirements of this NPRM, as well as instruction for submitting comments, go to https://go.usa.gov/xnsEA. The comment period closes on March 19, 2018.

Maintenance Placards

The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) has identified that attempting to fly in an aircraft currently undergoing maintenance, and not yet returned to service, is a causal factor in a number of fatal GA accidents. This month’s #FlySafe topic suggests adopting informal lock out/tag out procedures to ensure pilots are aware of un-airworthy aircraft conditions. See the fact sheet here: https://go.usa.gov/xnsPN.

How to Talk Like a Pilot

Pilots: How would you rate your aviation communication skills? Are you precise, yet concise? Courteous and classy? For important tips and techniques to improve your aviation lingo, have a look at the article, “How to Talk Like a Pilot” in the Jan/Feb 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at: 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can view a mobile-friendly version of this article at https://adobe.ly/2p7KwQb.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

Your ADS-B Questions Answered: Get the Facts Here Notice Number: NOTC7602

Thu, 02/08/2018 - 14:32

Question: Is ATC actually using ADS-B? I asked a controller to verify that my equipment was operating properly and she told me she did not have that information. How else can I verify that my equipment is operating properly?

Answer:  The FAA provides a free, easy way to check your Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) performance. The ADS-B Performance Monitor (APM) captures all the broadcast ADS-B information in U.S. airspace.  The APM captures your aircraft’s ADS-B broadcast automatically, every time you fly. To verify the performance of your system, request a Public ADS-B Performance Report (PAPR) after any flight. Make your request by going to: https://adsbperformance.faa.gov/PAPRRequest.aspx.

You may do this anytime, at no cost. The PAPR will identify any erroneous information your equipment broadcasts. You can take the report to your avionics installer who can help rectify any issues. We encourage operators to check the performance of your ADS-B equipment after installation and annually thereafter.

ATC first began using ADS-B at selected sites in the United States in 2010, and the FAA has steadily expanded integration and use throughout the NAS. There are still some TRACONS in the NAS that require modernization to be able to utilize ADS-B, but the FAA is on track to enable ADS-B use at these remaining facilities before the 2020 mandate. 

The FAA’s ADS-B network collects your broadcasted ADS-B information and passes it to the ATC automation system. ADS-B data is then combined with other surveillance data (where available), to create a single track of your aircraft for the controller’s display.

ADS-B messages contain many different information elements that are combined and simplified for presentation to ATC in a way that supports their primary mission of maintaining safe separation of aircraft. This simplified presentation tells a controller whether an aircraft is equipped with ADS-B and whether ADS-B is contributing to the presentation. It does not give the controller any insight into how well the ADS-B is performing or if all information elements comply with the requirements of the ADS-B mandate. Therefore, we discourage pilots from asking controllers for ADS-B performance details since this can add to workload and frequency congestion.

Don’t Get Left in the Hangar. Equip Now!

There’s only 23 months remaining before the January 1, 2020 ADS-B Out equipage deadline.

For more information, please visit the Equip ADS-B website www.faa.gov/nextgen/equipadsb/.

Questions about equipping? Please see our FAQs or contact us at adsb@faa.gov.

field_vote: 0No votes yet
Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

Your ADS-B Questions Answered: Get the Facts Here Notice Number: NOTC7602

Thu, 02/08/2018 - 14:32

Question: Is ATC actually using ADS-B? I asked a controller to verify that my equipment was operating properly and she told me she did not have that information. How else can I verify that my equipment is operating properly?

Answer:  The FAA provides a free, easy way to check your Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) performance. The ADS-B Performance Monitor (APM) captures all the broadcast ADS-B information in U.S. airspace.  The APM captures your aircraft’s ADS-B broadcast automatically, every time you fly. To verify the performance of your system, request a Public ADS-B Performance Report (PAPR) after any flight. Make your request by going to: https://adsbperformance.faa.gov/PAPRRequest.aspx.

You may do this anytime, at no cost. The PAPR will identify any erroneous information your equipment broadcasts. You can take the report to your avionics installer who can help rectify any issues. We encourage operators to check the performance of your ADS-B equipment after installation and annually thereafter.

ATC first began using ADS-B at selected sites in the United States in 2010, and the FAA has steadily expanded integration and use throughout the NAS. There are still some TRACONS in the NAS that require modernization to be able to utilize ADS-B, but the FAA is on track to enable ADS-B use at these remaining facilities before the 2020 mandate. 

The FAA’s ADS-B network collects your broadcasted ADS-B information and passes it to the ATC automation system. ADS-B data is then combined with other surveillance data (where available), to create a single track of your aircraft for the controller’s display.

ADS-B messages contain many different information elements that are combined and simplified for presentation to ATC in a way that supports their primary mission of maintaining safe separation of aircraft. This simplified presentation tells a controller whether an aircraft is equipped with ADS-B and whether ADS-B is contributing to the presentation. It does not give the controller any insight into how well the ADS-B is performing or if all information elements comply with the requirements of the ADS-B mandate. Therefore, we discourage pilots from asking controllers for ADS-B performance details since this can add to workload and frequency congestion.

Don’t Get Left in the Hangar. Equip Now!

There’s only 23 months remaining before the January 1, 2020 ADS-B Out equipage deadline.

For more information, please visit the Equip ADS-B website www.faa.gov/nextgen/equipadsb/.

Questions about equipping? Please see our FAQs or contact us at adsb@faa.gov.

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US