FAA/CAA

FAAST Blast — Week of Oct 19, 2020

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 10/23/2020 - 10:55

FAAST Blast — New Cessna AD, Latest LAANC Expansion, The Missing Link to Improved Safety
Notice Number: NOTC1494

FAAST Blast — Week of Oct 19, 2020 – Oct 25, 2020
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update


New Cessna AD Requires Inspection for Cracks at Strut Attach Fitting

The FAA has adopted an Airworthiness Directive (AD) for certain Textron Aviation Inc. Model 172, 182, 206, 207, and 210 airplanes. The AD, prompted by cracks found in the lower area of the forward cabin doorpost bulkhead, requires repetitively inspecting the lower area of the forward cabin doorposts at the strut attach fitting for cracks and repairing any cracks. This AD, which affects 14,653 airplanes of U.S. registry, is effective Nov. 12, 2020. For more details, click here: https://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance_Library/rgad.nsf/AOCADSearch/19913E178C43FB51862585FA0053DDF5?OpenDocument

Latest LAANC Expansion

The FAA recently made it easier for drone pilots to quickly and safely access controlled airspace by adding 133 air traffic facilities to the Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC) system. LAANC is an automated application and approval system for drone pilots requesting to fly below 400 feet in controlled airspace.

As the FAA continues to modernize the national airspace to accommodate more users, the agency made LAANC accessible for 726 airports and 537 facilities, covering 81 percent of eligible airspace. This expansion is based on feedback from the drone community. LAANC is a collaboration between the FAA and the Unmanned Aircraft Systems industry which directly supports the safe integration of drones into the nation’s airspace. The service is accessible to all pilots who operate under the FAA’s small drone rule (see www.faa.gov/uas/media/Part_107_Summary.pdf). For more information on LAANC, go to www.faa.gov/uas/programs_partnerships/data_exchange.

The Missing Link To Improved Safety

When it comes to aviation safety, we know having good data is critical. But in this case, both quality and quantity matter. Small amounts of data usually amount to a limited set of solutions. That’s why the FAA and the general aviation (GA) community have been working hard towards implementing more accessible data sharing solutions, including a flight data monitoring program known as the National General Aviation Flight Information Database (NGAFID). To learn more about the NGAFID and how some recent improvements have enhanced the user experience, see the FAA Safety Briefing article “The Missing Link” here: https://medium.com/faa/the-missing-link-abdc1fda5de6. Check out the entire issue at www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing
Address questions or comments to: [email protected]
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

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FAAST Blast — Week of Oct 05, 2020

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 10/08/2020 - 13:00

FAAST Blast — SFAR 118 Amendment, Advanced Preflight After Maintenance, Big Data Helps Improve Runway Safety
Notice Number: NOTC1425

FAAST Blast — Week of Oct 05, 2020 – Oct 11, 2020
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update
 

FAA Issues Second Amendment to SFAR 118

The FAA issued a final rule on September 30, 2020, that further amends Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) 118. Aviation activity continues to increase, and the industry is beginning to address the backlog of required training, checking, and testing requirements. However, many of the challenges that existed when the FAA first issued the SFAR in April remain today as the public health emergency continues. SFAR 118-2 is effective on October 1, 2020, and is available for public display in the Federal Register here: https://bit.ly/30Gs4i3.

The chart contained within this final rule provides a summary of each affected regulation; the original SFAR relief provided on April 29, 2020; the amended SFAR relief from June 25, 2020; and the second amended relief provided in this SFAR update. Those who may be affected by this amendment should carefully review the eligibility, conditions, and duration of each section of relief to ensure compliance. The FAA has revised the FAQs to help explain the amended regulatory relief: www.faa.gov/coronavirus/regulatory_updates/media/SFAR-COVID-FAQs.pdf. For additional news and information, go to www.faa.gov/coronavirus

 

Preflight After Maintenance

The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) have determined that a significant number of general aviation fatalities could be avoided if pilots were to conduct more thorough preflight inspections of aircraft that have just been returned to service. In-flight emergencies have been the direct result of maintenance personnel who have serviced or installed systems incorrectly. In many cases, although the maintenance personnel made the initial mistake, the pilot could have prevented the accident by performing a thorough or advanced preflight check. Read more on the FAA's blog at https://medium.com/faa/advanced-preflight-after-maintenance-196e847b9f07 or download the PDF fact sheet here: www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/2019/media/SE_Topic_19-09.pdf

 

Big Data Helps Improve Runway Safety

The FAA’s Runway Safety Group has taken Big Data and safety risk management for the runway surface to the next level with their new Surface Safety Metric (SSM) monitoring tool. What’s revolutionary about this new resource is that it uses all available data on runway excursions, incursions, and other surface incidents to see, measure, and fix risks. The SSM can easily identify single “high risk” events such as injuries or fatalities on runways so that the Runway Safety Group can take action to prevent future accidents or incidents. For more on this new development, see the FAA Safety Briefing article “Big Data, Little Team” here: http://bit.ly/SurfaceData. Check out the entire issue at www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing.


Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing
Address questions or comments to: [email protected]
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

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FAA Grant to Support Aviation Maintenance Careers

FAA & FAASTeam News - Tue, 09/08/2020 - 11:27

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) today announced the Aviation Maintenance Technical Workforce Development Grant Program to increase interest and recruit students for careers in aviation maintenance. The goal is to provide grants to academia and the aviation community to help prepare a more inclusive talent pool of aviation maintenance technicians, to inspire and recruit the next generation of aviation professionals. 

 

Congress appropriated $5 million in Fiscal Year 2020 to fund projects to address the projected shortages of aviation maintenance technical workers in the aviation industry. Eligible groups may apply for grants from $25,000 to $500,000 for any one grant in any one fiscal year. Potential applicants may visit the website for more information.

 

The FAA posted the announcement in the Federal Register today and will accept public comments until Sept. 23, 2020.

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Disinfecting Aircraft Requires Proper Substances and Care

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 09/04/2020 - 10:11

FAA Safety Team | Safer Skies Through Education

Notice Number: NOTC1336

These days, all we hear about is getting the face mask on and disinfecting wherever and whenever possible.  Keeping your aircraft or rental aircraft disinfected can mean introducing chemicals to the aircrafts interior that may be doing more bad than good.

As an industry leader in education, AOPA has provided a link to some additional information on the topic. Please read David Tulis’ top story at:

https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media/all-news/2020/august/20/improper-disinfectant-appears-to-damage-two-skyhawks

As pilots and mechanics, we should know that the certification process of any US built aircraft includes placarding.   Aircraft placards are placed in the cockpit to assist the pilot in completing required system checks or as a reminder of operational limits.  They are also used to insure ground personnel use proper procedures for ground handling such as fuel or towing restrictions.   

Please review 14 CFR Part 91.9, Civil Aircraft flight manual, marking, and placarding requirements found here: https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/CFR-2012-title14-vol2/pdf/CFR-2012-title14-vol2-sec91-9.pdf

Placard integrity is generally subject to exposure of the sun, can become fragile due to age, and may be destroyed by the lightest touch let alone being cleaned with disinfecting chemicals.  Use care when disinfecting your aircraft with alcohol or similar based cleaning products.  Be advised that any loss of placard data, no matter how small, may require the attention of an authorized mechanic to correct.  

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FAAST Blast — Week of July 27, 2020

FAA & FAASTeam News - Mon, 08/03/2020 - 10:06

FAAST Blast — New Runway Safety Animation, Pattern Precision, Humans Behind Human Factors
Notice Number: NOTC0248

FAAST Blast — Week of July 27, 2020 – Aug. 02, 2020
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update
 

New Runway Safety Animation Added

The Runway Safety Pilot Simulator online at www.RunwaySafetySimulator.com has a new animation. “The Anatomy of a Wrong Surface Event” is the second in a three-part series focusing on causal factors for wrong surface events, such as incorrect runway or taxiway approaches, landings, or departures. It highlights the importance of guarding against certain environmental factors that contribute to wrong surface events and other runway incursions. See the FAASTeam’s notice here for additional runway safety tips: www.bitly.com/31G44Nc

Pattern Precision

We know that regular, structured, proficiency training is perhaps the most effective means of reducing general aviation accidents. Because the traffic pattern involves nearly all piloting tasks, it is a logical choice for a proficiency training environment. Commitment to precision and consistency in pattern operations will yield operational safety benefits throughout the flight task spectrum. Have a closer look on the FAA’s blog at https://medium.com/faa/pattern-precision-cdf95fa76d8d or our FlySafe fact sheet at www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/2020/media/SE_Topic_20-07_Pattern_Precision.pdf.

Meet The Humans Behind FAA’s Human Factors Team

For decades, the FAA has been at the forefront of aviation human factors research, development, and practical application. While not always obvious to the average aviation consumer, this work is absolutely critical to preventing human-induced error and improving the safety of the NAS. Learn more about the FAA’s role in this important field in the FAA Safety Briefing article “The Humans Behind Human Factors: A Look at the People and Resources in the FAA’s Human Factors Team” (https://medium.com/faa/the-humans-behind-human-factors-e4b639cbac8b). Check out the entire July/Aug human factors-themed issue at www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing.

 

Have COVID-19 questions? Check out the FAA’s Coronavirus Information page for regulatory updates as well as helpful guidance/resources at https://www.faa.gov/coronavirus.

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The Helicopter Dirty Dozen Overview and Safety Strategies for Maintainers

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 07/24/2020 - 10:23

Online session

"Dirty Dozen for Helicopter Mechanics"
Topic: The Helicopter Dirty Dozen Overview and Safety Strategies for Maintainers.
On Wednesday, August 19, 2020 at 19:00 Eastern Daylight Time (16:00 PDT, 17:00 MDT, 18:00 CDT, 13:00 HST, 15:00 AKDT, 16:00 Arizona, 23:00 GMT)

Select Number:
SO13100940

Description:

Airplanes, Airplanes and Airplanes but what about the most versatile aircraft in the air that can hover?  Helicopters are complex machines and most mechanics are very technically proficient in their field but don't we all need effective strategies to prevent errors? After years of learning the Dirty Dozen we have put this great tool to use with multiple Helicopter/Tilt Rotor accidents.  Brought to you by the SC, NC, IA, CT, MO, MA, TN and the ME FAASTeam!

To view further details and registration information for this webinar, click here.

The sponsor for this seminar is: FAA Safety Team

The following credit(s) are available for the WINGS/AMT Programs:

AMT: 1.00

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FAAST Blast — Week of July 13, 2020

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 07/17/2020 - 10:10
 

FAA Safety Team | Safer Skies Through Education

FAAST Blast — New AD for Diamond DA 40, Virtual GA Town Hall, Safe Charter Ops, FAASB Live — July 23, Asleep at the Yoke?
Notice Number: NOTC0226

FAAST Blast — Week of July 13, 2020 – July 19, 2020
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update
 

New AD Issued for Diamond DA 40 Airplanes

The FAA is adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for Diamond Aircraft Industries Models DA 40, DA 40 F, and DA 40 NG airplanes. The AD addresses an issue with fuel tank connection hose deterioration that could result in contamination of the fuel system and restriction of fuel flow. The AD, effective August 4, 2020, requires actions to address the unsafe condition of these products. See the AD https://bit.ly/20201406 for more details.

Watch Recording of Virtual GA Town Hall

Did you miss the FAA’s virtual General Aviation Town Hall last month? You can watch the entire broadcast here: https://youtu.be/zDBu-XeIlSk. The Town Hall featured FAA Administrator Steve Dickson along with a host of FAA experts and GA community leaders discussing the effects of COVID-19 on operations, aircraft, airports, and infrastructure.

Safe Charter Operations

Join the FAA and industry for a discussion on knowing what to look for when you're chartering an aircraft. If you have any questions about safe charter operations, join the open discussion we are live streaming on Facebook (www.facebook.com/FAA), Twitter www.twitter.com/FAANews), and YouTube (www.youtube.com/FAANews) on July 21 at 2:00 p.m. ET. No registration is necessary. Go to www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/safe_charter_operations for more info.

Reminder — FAA Safety Briefing Live Webinar — July 23

The next FAA Safety Briefing Live is coming your way starting at 1900 CT on Thursday, July 23, 2020. The live-streaming broadcast will introduce the July/August 2020 issue, which focuses on the importance of human factors in aviation. To access this presentation, go to https://www.faasafetybriefing.com/July-August2020.html. Registration is not required.

Asleep at the Yoke?

Fatigue is that drowsy, weary, sleepy feeling you get when you haven’t had enough rest — something we all probably know too well. But if you are involved in safety-related aviation activities, like piloting or maintaining an aircraft, the consequences of fatigue can be disastrous. In her recent article, “Asleep at the Yoke?” (https://medium.com/faa/asleep-at-the-yoke-7981a821f1f2) FAA Safety Briefing editor Jennifer Caron explores some of the negative and insidious effects of fatigue and offers some helpful advice on how to combat it. Check out the entire July/Aug human factors-themed issue at www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing.

 

Have COVID-19 questions? Check out the FAA’s Coronavirus Information page for regulatory updates as well as helpful guidance/resources at https://www.faa.gov/coronavirus.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing
Address questions or comments to: [email protected]
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

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July/August 2020 issue of FAA Safety Briefing

FAA & FAASTeam News - Wed, 07/15/2020 - 12:09

The July/August 2020 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on the importance of human factors in aviation.

Feature articles and departments address stress, fatigue, decision making, cognitive bias, and more. We also take a closer look at the humans behind the FAA's Human Factors team to see how their work is helping improve aviation safety.

Features include:

Passing the Stress Test Keep the Dark Side of Stress at Bay

Just a Bit Biased How to See and Avoid Dangerous Assumptions

Asleep at the Yoke? Fighting Fatigue in General Aviation

The Humans Behind Human Factors A Look at the People and Resources in the FAA’s Human Factors Team

Tool Time Beta-Testing a Maintenance Safety Culture Assessment Toolkit

To “B” or Not to “B” ... Why Equipping with ADS-B Makes Sense

Check out the entire July/Aug human factors-themed issue at www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing.

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FAAST Blast — Week of July 05, 2020

FAA & FAASTeam News - Mon, 07/06/2020 - 14:53

FAAST Blast — Week of July 05, 2020 – July 11, 2020
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update
 

FAA Safety Briefing Live Webinar — July 23

The next FAA Safety Briefing Live is coming your way starting at 1900 CT on Thursday, July 23, 2020. The live-streaming broadcast will introduce the July/August 2020 issue, which focuses on the importance of human factors in aviation. Feature articles and departments address stress, fatigue, decision making, cognitive bias, and more. We also take a closer look at the humans behind the FAA’s Human Factors team to see how their work is helping to improve aviation safety.

To access this presentation, go to https://www.faasafetybriefing.com/July-August2020.html. Registration is not required. To earn WINGS credit for viewing the presentation, please click the “Earn WINGS Credit” button from within the presentation window. You can also view and earn WINGS credit on archived broadcasts of FAA Safety Briefing Live. Follow the link on the lower right corner of the page, or go to www.faasafetybriefing.com.

Amendment to Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) 118

The FAA has issued an amendment to Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) 118 https://bit.ly/31wjLGZ, which provides relief for certain persons and operations during the public health emergency concerning COVID-19.The amendment recognizes that even as stay-at-home advisories are lifted, airmen continue to experience difficulty complying with certain training, recency, checking, testing and duration requirements. The amendment extends some medical certificate relief that the original SFAR provided and expands medical relief to people whose certificates will expire in the coming months. It also expands relief to a new population of airmen who may be unable to satisfy training and qualification requirements due to disruptions caused by the COVID-19 public health emergency. Those who may be affected by this amendment should carefully review the eligibility, conditions, and duration of each section of relief to ensure compliance. The FAA has revised its FAQ page at https://bit.ly/38gIUqi (PDF) to help explain the amended regulatory relief.

Passing the Stress Test

Our new July/August issue of FAA Safety Briefing covers a topic near and dear to all airmen — human factors. Certain cognitive functions immediately come to mind in the aviation arena, like attention, detection, perception, memory, judgment/reasoning, and decision making. But for FAA Safety Briefing Editor Susan Parson, there is one universal human reaction that she characterizes as the ultimate human factor: stress. In her article, “Passing the Stress Test,” (https://medium.com/faa/passing-the-stress-test-ef69156eef61) Parson explores the duality of stress (there’s a good side to it!) and provides some helpful tips on how to properly identify and manage stress. Check out the entire July/Aug human factors-themed issue at www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing.

 

Have COVID-19 questions? Check out the FAA’s Coronavirus Information page for regulatory updates as well as helpful guidance/resources at https://www.faa.gov/coronavirus.

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FAA Safety Briefing 7-2-2020

FAA & FAASTeam News - Mon, 07/06/2020 - 09:11

Human factors play a big role in aviation safety, not only for those who pilot aircraft, but also for those who design, manufacture, and maintain them.

It’s almost axiomatic to say that human factors are somehow involved in every aviation incident or accident. That includes drone accidents. While officially known as “unmanned aircraft systems,” most drones still have pilots — and the remote pilot of a drone is as human as any other pilot. The very nature of human beings carries the inevitability of mistakes. Even though designers and engineers have worked very hard over the years to design machines that are immune to, or at least tolerant of, mistakes by those who fly and fix them, human beings have a remarkable way of finding new ways to make errors. We all know that those errors can be deadly in aviation.

Read More

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