News

Human Factors in Aviation Maintenance Quarterly March 2018

AskBob News - Mon, 06/25/2018 - 10:57

The March 2018 issue of Avation MX Human Factors Quarterly is now available at https://www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/maintenance_hf/fatigue/publications/media/
Aviation-Mx-HF-Newsletter-March-2018.pdf

In this issue 

* Meet the Authors
*  Just Culture Stories: What can go right and what can go wrong
*  “It Doesn’t Happen Overnight!” - Improving Safety Culture in the Workplace
*  Beyond “Swiss Cheese” – How organizational choices make the holes bigger and accidents more likely
*  Data mining in Maintenance Human Factors using wearable devices and text mining
*  We Want You!
*  Upcoming Events

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Categories: News, US

AD 2016-19-13 Dassault - Applicability issue for Falcon 2000

AskBob News - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 12:55

By looking at both AD versions below you will see a difference. The Federal Register version is correct which includes the Falcon 2000 in the "Applicability" section of the AD. The version you find on the FAA main website faa.gov which is typically used includes the 2000EX but excludes Falcon 2000.  

Maintenance controllers will use various methods for checking for possible new ADs, typically not the Federal Register that I know of. The AD biweekly listing includes the 2000EX, but excludes the 2000. Also, if you search by Make/Model it will come up for 2000EX, not the 2000. This AD can easily be missed. AD must be settled "Within 24 months after the effective date of this AD".   The effective date is 11/22/16, so it is getting close. 

The AD does include the Falcon 2000 in the preamble & modification sections so it does help send up a flag about it if the Federal Register isin't checked. If relying on the indexes or applicability section then it easily can be missed.

I contacted the FAA per the AD and received an email directing me to use the Federal Register version for compliance. I notified my FAA PMI of my handling.

 

I'm sharing this to hopefully prevent non-compliance.

 

FAA AD  http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Guidance_Library/rgad.nsf/0/74d74d0c76a67ed786258050005838da/$FILE/2016-19-13.pdf

 

Federal Register version https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-10-18/pdf/2016-22832.pdf

  T. Nolte
Chief Inspector

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Categories: News, US

Aviation Ground Support Equipment: A Brief History

AskBob News - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 11:12

Here at GSE Solutions, we are fascinated by the Aviation industries’ rich and intriguing past which stretches back to the early 18th century. A series of technological breakthroughs has since helped shape the way people manoeuvre aircraft and ground support equipment today. Here is a detailed guide of prominent dates throughout the last 300-years which highlights important historical events.

The earliest development of ground support equipment dates back to 1705. This was the year in which the Goldhofer family started a forge in Armendigan, Germany. The forge evolved over time and created the very first innovation centre for designing and creating brand new mechanical concepts.

In 1923, Forklift manufacturer Clark Material Handling built the Duat Tow Tractor. This design was tasked with pulling freight, lumber and industrial material. The model is widely considered to be the inspiration for many of the designs we see operating in the present day.

World War II had an incredibly significant impact on the Aviation industry. At the beginning of the conflict in 1939, the US Army had just under 4,000 aircrafts within their fleet, whereas the latter stages saw them reach almost 400,000. The biggest impact on production came in 1944, when 100,000 aircrafts were manufactured.

This created the very first marketing opportunity for ground support equipment and provided a chance for well-known manufacturers to get their ideas and concepts into circulation.

Some of the big names to establish themselves during this period were Stewart & Stevenson, who constructed hundreds of tractors and ordnance loaders for the US army, and the Northwestern Motor Company, who introduced their very first tow tractor design.

The Hobart Brothers were another company who oversaw a heavy production line throughout these years, culminating in a vast number of generators and welders being built to support the war efforts by Allied forces.

This particular organization would then play a huge part in the first few years after the conclusion of the war. This was when commercial Aviation started to take a stronghold around the world, which meant specialized equipment needed to be manufactured to keep up with demands.

The Hobart Brothers decided the set up Hobart Ground Power, to help American Airlines design generators that were powerful enough to start up large scale aircraft.

Garsite LLC also designed and distributed a wide range of specialist Aviation equipment. They manufactured: hydrant dispensers, fuel delivery trucks, above-ground fuel storage tanks, Aviation storage systems and vacuum pumper trucks.

Other notable events that took place within the early stages of peace time were Stewart & Stevenson entering the GSE business alongside GM Detroit Petrol, British company Textron GSE being founded and Tracma starting their line of tractors which were specifically designed for towing aircraft.

In 1960, engineers working at FMC Corporation started to design and construct some of the very first deicer vehicles. Some of the earliest models were able to fully deice aeroplanes in just 10-minutes.

The company also helped to develop a brand new cargo handling system for the new generation of aircraft. Their concept, known as the Flite-Line Loader, allowed people to unload the entirety of a plane’s cargo with ease.

This was also the year in which Unitron started to supply the defense-aerospace, aviation and industrial markets with GPU’s, PCA’s and other power systems.

In 1969, Eagle tugs introduced the world to the Cargo Bobtail Tow Tractor. This design is still the premier towing tractor used today, being sold across the world at multiple Aviation marketplaces. These robust and low-profile models have encapsulated the long-term aims set out by visionaries in the very early stages of the aviation industry.

This article was written by Aviation enthusiast David Newman. David is the Director of Aviation marketing agency Ad Lab and works on behalf of Aviation specialists, GSE Solutions. 

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Categories: News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of May 14, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 05/18/2018 - 10:11
 

FAA Safety Team | Safer Skies Through Education

FAAST Blast — FAA Safety Briefing Live, Best Glide Speed, AMT ACS Draft Now Available, Fresh Approach to Improving Runway Safety
Notice Number: NOTC7782

FAAST Blast — Week of May 14, 2018 – May 20, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

Watch FAA Safety Briefing Live
Did you miss the FAA Safety Briefing Live broadcast last week? No worries. Just go to http://www.faasafetybriefing.com/May-June.html to view an archived version of the broadcast. This edition introduces the May/June 2018 “Partnering with PEGASAS” issue, highlighting the FAA’s General Aviation Center of Excellence. You can also earn WINGS credit by completing a quiz after viewing the presentation. Just click the “Earn WINGS Credit” button in the presentation window.

Best Glide Speed and Distance
The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) has determined that a significant number of general aviation fatalities could be avoided if pilots were better informed and trained in determining and flying their aircraft at the best glide speed while maneuvering to complete a forced landing. Learn more about best glide speed by downloading our #FlySafe fact sheet here: http://bit.ly/2rfMV9p.

AMT Airman Certification Standards Draft Document Now Available
The FAA is in the process of replacing the Aviation Mechanic General, Airframe, and Powerplant Practical Test Standards (PTS) with a single, more comprehensive, Aviation Maintenance Technician (AMT) Airman Certification Standards (ACS) document. The ACS will help provide a single set of standards for the AMT knowledge, oral, and practical tests and help applicants understand what they will need to know, consider, and do to earn an AMT certificate with Airframe and Powerplant ratings. A draft of the new AMT ACS is available at www.faa.gov/training_testing/testing/acs/media/amt_acs.pdf. Please provide comments to [email protected] by May 31, 2018. The final version of the AMT ACS is expected to be effective June 2020.

Taking a Fresh Approach to Improving Runway Surfaces and Safety

The FAA and PEGASAS, the FAA’s General Aviation Center of Excellence, are exploring innovative and economical ways to improve our runway surfaces and safety. This partnership has researched ways to re-purpose safety features from other industries for use in aviation. Take for example rumble strips — we use them on our roadways, why not at our airports? To find out more about these fresh approaches to runway surface improvements and safety, check out the article, “Remote Sensors? Rumble Strips? Heated Pavements? Oh My!” in the March/April 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version at https://adobe.ly/2w8uYPE.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: [email protected]v.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

 

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of April 30, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 05/04/2018 - 11:11

FAAST Blast — FAA Safety Briefing Live, Best Glide Speed, NTSB LOC Roundtable, New PEGASUS Issue of Safety Briefing
Notice Number: NOTC7757

FAAST Blast — Week of April 30, 2018 – May 06, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

Watch FAA Safety Briefing Live!
The next FAA Safety Briefing Live is coming your way starting at 1900 CT on Monday, May 07, 2018. The live-streaming broadcast will introduce the May/June 2018 “Partnering with PEGASAS” issue, highlighting the FAA’s General Aviation Center of Excellence. For more details on how to access this presentation, go to https://www.faasafety.gov/SPANS/event_details.aspx?eid=82666. To earn WINGS credit for viewing the presentation, please click the “Earn WINGS Credit” button from within the presentation window.

Best Glide Speed
The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) has determined that a significant number of general aviation fatalities could be avoided if pilots were better informed and trained in determining and flying their aircraft at the best glide speed while maneuvering to complete a forced landing. #FlySafe and download our fact sheet at http://bit.ly/2rfMV9p for more info. You can also watch a video of the presentation at: https://youtu.be/dzK5xTAe2Z0.

NTSB Hosts Roundtable on Preventing Loss of Control

On April 24, the NTSB hosted an important roundtable discussion on ways to prevent loss of control accidents in GA. Attendees included several experts from the FAA, industry and academia who focused primarily on the role of training and technology in keeping GA safe. A webcast archive of the event is available for viewing for the next three months at http://ntsb.capitolconnection.org/.

Partnering with PEGASAS

The May/June 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on the FAA’s Center of Excellence for general aviation research, the Partnership for Enhancing General Aviation Safety, Accessibility, and Sustainability (PEGASAS). This partnership facilitates collaboration and coordination between government, academia, and industry to advance aviation technologies and expand FAA research capabilities. Feature articles in this issue focus on several of these forward thinking and safety enhancing projects. For a good primer on what PEGASAS is and how it operates, check out the article “Let it Flow! PEGASAS Inspires a River of Research.” Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version of the article at https://adobe.ly/2w40YED.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: [email protected].
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of April 30, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 05/04/2018 - 11:11

FAAST Blast — FAA Safety Briefing Live, Best Glide Speed, NTSB LOC Roundtable, New PEGASUS Issue of Safety Briefing
Notice Number: NOTC7757

FAAST Blast — Week of April 30, 2018 – May 06, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

Watch FAA Safety Briefing Live!
The next FAA Safety Briefing Live is coming your way starting at 1900 CT on Monday, May 07, 2018. The live-streaming broadcast will introduce the May/June 2018 “Partnering with PEGASAS” issue, highlighting the FAA’s General Aviation Center of Excellence. For more details on how to access this presentation, go to https://www.faasafety.gov/SPANS/event_details.aspx?eid=82666. To earn WINGS credit for viewing the presentation, please click the “Earn WINGS Credit” button from within the presentation window.

Best Glide Speed
The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) has determined that a significant number of general aviation fatalities could be avoided if pilots were better informed and trained in determining and flying their aircraft at the best glide speed while maneuvering to complete a forced landing. #FlySafe and download our fact sheet at http://bit.ly/2rfMV9p for more info. You can also watch a video of the presentation at: https://youtu.be/dzK5xTAe2Z0.

NTSB Hosts Roundtable on Preventing Loss of Control

On April 24, the NTSB hosted an important roundtable discussion on ways to prevent loss of control accidents in GA. Attendees included several experts from the FAA, industry and academia who focused primarily on the role of training and technology in keeping GA safe. A webcast archive of the event is available for viewing for the next three months at http://ntsb.capitolconnection.org/.

Partnering with PEGASAS

The May/June 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on the FAA’s Center of Excellence for general aviation research, the Partnership for Enhancing General Aviation Safety, Accessibility, and Sustainability (PEGASAS). This partnership facilitates collaboration and coordination between government, academia, and industry to advance aviation technologies and expand FAA research capabilities. Feature articles in this issue focus on several of these forward thinking and safety enhancing projects. For a good primer on what PEGASAS is and how it operates, check out the article “Let it Flow! PEGASAS Inspires a River of Research.” Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version of the article at https://adobe.ly/2w40YED.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: [email protected].
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAA Safety Briefing May/June 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 05/03/2018 - 14:41
 

Your source for general aviation news and information

Read the Latest Issue!

The May/June 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on the FAA’s Center of Excellence for general aviation research, the Partnership for Enhancing General Aviation Safety, Accessibility, and Sustainability (PEGASAS). This partnership facilitates collaboration and coordination between government, academia, and industry to advance aviation technologies and expand FAA research capabilities. Feature articles in this issue focus on several of these forward thinking and safety enhancing projects.

Feature Stories

Click on headline below to read each mobile-friendly article online.

  Let it Flow! PEGASAS Inspires a River of Research

 

  Pushing the Envelope A Plan of “Attack” for Loss of Control

 

  Weather … Or Not? Weather Technology in the Cockpit

 

  LED There Be Light Working to Enhance Airport Lighting

 

  Remote Sensors? Rumble Strips? Heated Pavements? Oh My! 3 Fresh Approaches to Improve Runway Surfaces and Safety

 

  How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Singularity Using Collective Data to Drive Safety Improvement   Download Entire Magazine

PDF  |  EPUB  (for e-readers) |  MOBI (for Kindle)

 

Scroll up to the "Feature Stories" section to open each feature article in an easy-to-read online format.

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAA Safety Briefing May/June 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 05/03/2018 - 14:41
 

Your source for general aviation news and information

Read the Latest Issue!

The May/June 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on the FAA’s Center of Excellence for general aviation research, the Partnership for Enhancing General Aviation Safety, Accessibility, and Sustainability (PEGASAS). This partnership facilitates collaboration and coordination between government, academia, and industry to advance aviation technologies and expand FAA research capabilities. Feature articles in this issue focus on several of these forward thinking and safety enhancing projects.

Feature Stories

Click on headline below to read each mobile-friendly article online.

  Let it Flow! PEGASAS Inspires a River of Research

 

  Pushing the Envelope A Plan of “Attack” for Loss of Control

 

  Weather … Or Not? Weather Technology in the Cockpit

 

  LED There Be Light Working to Enhance Airport Lighting

 

  Remote Sensors? Rumble Strips? Heated Pavements? Oh My! 3 Fresh Approaches to Improve Runway Surfaces and Safety

 

  How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Singularity Using Collective Data to Drive Safety Improvement   Download Entire Magazine

PDF  |  EPUB  (for e-readers) |  MOBI (for Kindle)

 

Scroll up to the "Feature Stories" section to open each feature article in an easy-to-read online format.

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAA allows pilots to conduct PA–28 fuel selector inspections

AskBob News - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 10:57

From AOPA News

The FAA has published a final rule that supersedes an airworthiness directive (AD) issued in January, and will allow owners of many Piper PA–28-series airplanes who hold at least a private pilot certificate to inspect their aircraft fuel-tank selector cover placards for proper positioning.

The new AD’s terms reflect the FAA’s consideration of AOPA's comments, and could save aircraft owners and pilots more than $763,000 in labor costs for the inspections, fleet-wide.

 

Since the AD was issued Jan. 23, its compliance deadline has been pushed back three times in response to successive alternative method of compliance (AMOC) requests from AOPA—first to allow for public comments to be reviewed, and now, to cover the time interval until the updated AD’s April 20 effective date.

 

Aircraft owners who elect to use AOPA’s global AMOC must first notify their appropriate principal inspector or manager of the local flight standards district office. After the AD’s April 20 effective date, aircraft owners can perform the initial inspection.

The AD arose “from a quality control issue that resulted in the installation of fuel tank selector covers with the placement of the left and right fuel tank selector placards installed in reverse,” according to the document, which adds that “the unsafe condition, if not addressed, could result in fuel starvation and loss of engine power in flight.”

AOPA’s comments noted that “we are unware of any accidents or incidents that have occurred as a result of improper placards. Many of the affected fleet have been in operation for decades and the owner/operator has likely verified the accuracy of the fuel selector and corresponding tank through fuel gauge readings over hundreds, if not thousands of hours.”

In its favorable response, the FAA noted that since it issued the AD, “we have determined that the owner/operator (pilot) holding at least a private pilot certificate will be allowed to perform the preflight check of the fuel tank selector placards.”

The inspection check must be entered into the airplane records to show compliance with the AD. If the inspection reveals that the placards are not properly installed, a temporary placard must be installed before further flight, with a permanent corrected placard replacement accomplished within the next 100 hours time-in-service.

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Categories: News, US

FAA allows pilots to conduct PA–28 fuel selector inspections

AskBob News - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 10:57

From AOPA News

The FAA has published a final rule that supersedes an airworthiness directive (AD) issued in January, and will allow owners of many Piper PA–28-series airplanes who hold at least a private pilot certificate to inspect their aircraft fuel-tank selector cover placards for proper positioning.

The new AD’s terms reflect the FAA’s consideration of AOPA's comments, and could save aircraft owners and pilots more than $763,000 in labor costs for the inspections, fleet-wide.

 

Since the AD was issued Jan. 23, its compliance deadline has been pushed back three times in response to successive alternative method of compliance (AMOC) requests from AOPA—first to allow for public comments to be reviewed, and now, to cover the time interval until the updated AD’s April 20 effective date.

 

Aircraft owners who elect to use AOPA’s global AMOC must first notify their appropriate principal inspector or manager of the local flight standards district office. After the AD’s April 20 effective date, aircraft owners can perform the initial inspection.

The AD arose “from a quality control issue that resulted in the installation of fuel tank selector covers with the placement of the left and right fuel tank selector placards installed in reverse,” according to the document, which adds that “the unsafe condition, if not addressed, could result in fuel starvation and loss of engine power in flight.”

AOPA’s comments noted that “we are unware of any accidents or incidents that have occurred as a result of improper placards. Many of the affected fleet have been in operation for decades and the owner/operator has likely verified the accuracy of the fuel selector and corresponding tank through fuel gauge readings over hundreds, if not thousands of hours.”

In its favorable response, the FAA noted that since it issued the AD, “we have determined that the owner/operator (pilot) holding at least a private pilot certificate will be allowed to perform the preflight check of the fuel tank selector placards.”

The inspection check must be entered into the airplane records to show compliance with the AD. If the inspection reveals that the placards are not properly installed, a temporary placard must be installed before further flight, with a permanent corrected placard replacement accomplished within the next 100 hours time-in-service.

Categories: News, US

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 04/05/2018 - 11:38

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm
Notice Number: NOTC7704

 

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm

We have a sense of humor, too, but an April Fool’s joke that the Federal Aviation Administration is extending the ADS-B deadline is just that.

As stated in the final rule published with industry input in May 2010, all aircraft flying in designated controlled airspace – generally the same busy airspace where transponders are currently required – must be equipped with ADS-B Out avionics by Jan. 1, 2020. Only aircraft that fly in uncontrolled airspace, and aircraft without electrical systems, such as balloons and gliders, are exempt from the mandate.

Those who have already equipped understand that ADS-B is transforming the nation’s airspace by providing more precision and reliability than the current radar system, enhancing safety and increasing situational awareness.

Time is running out. There are only 21 months left until the deadline. If you have any questions about equipage – whether you need to or not, what equipment to get, etc. – please see the FAA’s Equip ADS-B website. For information about the transformational technology, visit the ADS-B website.

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 04/05/2018 - 11:38

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm
Notice Number: NOTC7704

 

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm

We have a sense of humor, too, but an April Fool’s joke that the Federal Aviation Administration is extending the ADS-B deadline is just that.

As stated in the final rule published with industry input in May 2010, all aircraft flying in designated controlled airspace – generally the same busy airspace where transponders are currently required – must be equipped with ADS-B Out avionics by Jan. 1, 2020. Only aircraft that fly in uncontrolled airspace, and aircraft without electrical systems, such as balloons and gliders, are exempt from the mandate.

Those who have already equipped understand that ADS-B is transforming the nation’s airspace by providing more precision and reliability than the current radar system, enhancing safety and increasing situational awareness.

Time is running out. There are only 21 months left until the deadline. If you have any questions about equipage – whether you need to or not, what equipment to get, etc. – please see the FAA’s Equip ADS-B website. For information about the transformational technology, visit the ADS-B website.

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of April 2, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 15:58

FAAST Blast — AD Issued for Certain Bonanzas, Sun ‘n Fun 2018, How to Be a Weather Wingman
Notice Number: NOTC7703

FAAST Blast — Week of April 2, 2018 – April 8, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

FAA Issues AD for Certain Bonanza Airplanes
The FAA last week issued an AD for certain Textron Aviation A36TC, B36TC, S35, V35, V35A, and V35B airplanes. AD 2018-06-11 adds a life limit to the exhaust tailpipe v-band coupling (clamp) that attaches the exhaust tailpipe to the turbocharger and requires an annual visual inspection. The AD, which is effective May 3, 2018, affects 731 airplanes of U.S. registry. For more details, go to go.usa.gov/xQgfr

Sun ‘n Fun 2018
Get ready for some fun in the sun aviation style at this year’s Sun ’n Fun International Fly-In and Expo, scheduled to take place April 10-15, 2018, in Lakeland, Fla. The event features aerial performances, exhibits, and a wide variety of educational seminars (visit bit.ly/SnF18 for more information).

The FAA will also host a series of safety forums between 8:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. each day at the FAA Safety Team’s National Resource Center. NTSB Board Member Dr. Earl Weener will speak about loss of control accidents and the FAA’s General Aviation and Commercial Division Manager, Brad Palmer, will discuss the agency’s efforts to enhance GA safety. Other forum topics include wilderness survival, BasicMed, UAS regulations, and ADS-B equipage. For updates to the safety forum schedule, go to go.usa.gov/x9MZq. And if you’re planning to fly to Sun ’n Fun, don’t forget to read the 2018 Sun ’n Fun Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) available here or go to faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/notices.

How to Be a Weather Wingman

Pilots: What if we told you that you could help be a good cockpit companion even when you’re not in the same plane? Better yet, how about if you had the power to potentially help save a fellow pilot’s life — maybe several pilots — with a simple click of the mic? Find out how by reading the article “How to Be a Weather Wingman — Pay It Forward with PIREPs” in the March/April 2018 flying companion-themed issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version of this article at https://adobe.ly/2FBn459.  

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: [email protected].
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of April 2, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 15:58

FAAST Blast — AD Issued for Certain Bonanzas, Sun ‘n Fun 2018, How to Be a Weather Wingman
Notice Number: NOTC7703

FAAST Blast — Week of April 2, 2018 – April 8, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

FAA Issues AD for Certain Bonanza Airplanes
The FAA last week issued an AD for certain Textron Aviation A36TC, B36TC, S35, V35, V35A, and V35B airplanes. AD 2018-06-11 adds a life limit to the exhaust tailpipe v-band coupling (clamp) that attaches the exhaust tailpipe to the turbocharger and requires an annual visual inspection. The AD, which is effective May 3, 2018, affects 731 airplanes of U.S. registry. For more details, go to go.usa.gov/xQgfr

Sun ‘n Fun 2018
Get ready for some fun in the sun aviation style at this year’s Sun ’n Fun International Fly-In and Expo, scheduled to take place April 10-15, 2018, in Lakeland, Fla. The event features aerial performances, exhibits, and a wide variety of educational seminars (visit bit.ly/SnF18 for more information).

The FAA will also host a series of safety forums between 8:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. each day at the FAA Safety Team’s National Resource Center. NTSB Board Member Dr. Earl Weener will speak about loss of control accidents and the FAA’s General Aviation and Commercial Division Manager, Brad Palmer, will discuss the agency’s efforts to enhance GA safety. Other forum topics include wilderness survival, BasicMed, UAS regulations, and ADS-B equipage. For updates to the safety forum schedule, go to go.usa.gov/x9MZq. And if you’re planning to fly to Sun ’n Fun, don’t forget to read the 2018 Sun ’n Fun Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) available here or go to faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/notices.

How to Be a Weather Wingman

Pilots: What if we told you that you could help be a good cockpit companion even when you’re not in the same plane? Better yet, how about if you had the power to potentially help save a fellow pilot’s life — maybe several pilots — with a simple click of the mic? Find out how by reading the article “How to Be a Weather Wingman — Pay It Forward with PIREPs” in the March/April 2018 flying companion-themed issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version of this article at https://adobe.ly/2FBn459.  

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: [email protected].
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US