News

January/February 2019 issue of FAA Safety Briefing

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 01/31/2019 - 09:40
ADS-B Out — A One Year Countdown

The January/February 2019 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) technology, a foundational component of FAA’s NextGen system for improving the safety and efficiency of the NAS.

Building off our previous ADS-B focused issue in March/April 2017, articles here continue and expand the discussion about the safety and technology benefits of ADS-B, as well as provide important details and updates on the purchase, installation, and operation of ADS-B equipment.

Remember – the deadline to equip with ADS-B Out is January 1, 2020.

Feature Stories

Click on an image or headline below to read each mobile-friendly article online.

  Time to Move! Why ADS-B Matters

 

  The "In" Thing in Aviation Safety Making the Most of Your ADS-B System Solution

 

  Clearing the Crypto-Fog Tips for Decoding and Deciding Among ADS-B Equipment Options

 

  Is My ADS-B Broadcasting Me? A Look at Non-Performing Emitters

 

  Sorry, Wrong Number A Fresh Look at Avoiding Call Sign Mismatch Issues

 

  ADS-B Light Exploring ADS-B Out Options for Light-Sport and Experimental Aircraft

 

  Show Me the $$ How to Get Your ADS-B Out Rebate field_vote: 0No votes yet
Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of Jan. 28, 2019

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 01/31/2019 - 09:07

FAA Safety Team | Safer Skies Through Education

FAAST Blast — SuperBowl TFR, Portable Fire Extinguisher Inspections, New ADS-B issue of FAA Safety Briefing
Notice Number: NOTC8268

FAAST Blast — Week of Jan. 28, 2019 – Feb. 03, 2019
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

Special Air Traffic Procedures in Effect for Super Bowl LIII

In anticipation of a large number of aircraft operating in the Atlanta area during the week of Super Bowl LIII, special security provisions will be in effect for this event including (but not limited to) Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs), two−way communication, and discrete transponder requirements. Pilots are encouraged to check Notices to Airmen (NOTAMs) frequently to verify they have the most current information. To view the text and graphic depictions of the restrictions, go to tfr.faa.gov/save_pages/detail_9_5231.html. A plain-language description of the TFR is available at superbowl.faa.gov/tfr_superbowl53. Also note that the airspace around Mercedes-Benz Stadium will be a No Drone Zone on game day and during certain times in the days leading up to the game. For more details, go to http://bit.ly/2RW42gO.

For up-to-date information on general aviation and drone safety related to this event, please monitor the FAA’s Twitter accounts at @FAASafetyBrief and @FAANews and Facebook account at www.facebook.com/FAA.

FAA Issues InFO on Portable Fire Extinguisher Inspection Requirements

Last December, the FAA issued an Information for Operators (InFO) bulletin that reminds aircraft owners, operators, air agencies, suppliers, distributors, and maintenance technicians that hand-held/portable fire extinguishers have the potential to leak, and should be inspected per the proper prescribing guidance. The FAA also recommends operators be familiar with any record-keeping requirements for hand-held/portable fire extinguishers. For more details, see InFO 18013 at: https://go.usa.gov/xE8V6.

An All “Out” Effort

The January/February 2019 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) technology, a foundational component of the FAA’s NextGen system for improving the safety and efficiency of the NAS. Building off our previous ADS-B focused issue in March/April 2017, articles here continue and expand the discussion about the safety and technology benefits of ADS-B, as well as provide important details and updates on the purchase, installation, and operation of ADS-B equipment. For an overview of this issue, check out the article, “Time to Move! — Why ADS-B Matters” at bit.ly/adsb2020. You can download the entire issue at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB.

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing.
Address questions or comments to: [email protected].
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief.

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

Progress Being Made On U.S. Mechanic Development

AskBob News - Wed, 01/02/2019 - 09:41

US training programs are producing more aviation mechanics, and enrollment is expected to keep growing, according to the Aviation Technician Education Council. The enrollment in maintenance technician schools is expected to increase 40% in 2019.

MRO Network

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Categories: News, US

General aviation affected by federal government shutdown

AskBob News - Thu, 12/27/2018 - 11:23

Numerous Federal Aviation Administration functions will not be available during the federal government shutdown, including the issuance of airmen certificates, aviation rulemaking, drone operations exemptions and the development, testing and evaluation of NextGen technologies. Customs and Border Protection and the Transportation Security Administration will continue to work normal business hours.

General Aviation News

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Categories: News, US

FAAST Blast — PIREP Enhancements, MMEL/MEL Relief, Flying Light

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 12/13/2018 - 14:31

FAAST Blast — Week of Dec. 10, 2018 – Dec. 16, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update
PIREP Process Enhancements
While Pilot Reports (PIREPs) are an important component of safe and efficient flight, their numbers have declined in recent years as part of the trend of fewer inflight contacts. An NTSB study has also concluded that to encourage more PIREPS, the process needs to be simpler and less time-consuming. To help address these concerns, Flight Service improvements have been developed to make it easier for pilots to submit a PIREP. For example, flight service specialists now only use read-back for accuracy when there is uncertainty about information a pilot provides. In addition, specialists are now encouraged to request specific details pertinent to the current or forecast weather, shortening the time required to obtain a PIREP from pilots eager to return to ATC frequencies.
Another simple way to prepare and send PIREPs from the cockpit is with inflight electronic PIREP submissions. It works with an easy-to-use, menu-based interface either on a mobile device or cockpit avionics, which allows word selection to describe the level of the weather experienced. As suggested by the NTSB, vendors have modified platforms to accept PIREP submissions up to five hours after occurrence, providing additional valuable data to fill in observation gaps for forecast models and advisory products. Click here for more on electronic PIREP submission. You can also learn more about PIREPS in the article “How to Be a Weather Wingman” in the March/April 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing.

MMEL/MEL Relief for Items Installed via Supplemental Type Certificate
If you use a Master Minimum Equipment List (MMEL) as a Minimum Equipment List (MEL) under the provisions of a letter of authorization (LOA) D095, or an FAA-approved MEL under LOA D195, please see FAA InFO 18012. This is especially important if you have items installed on your aircraft via Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) and desire MMEL/MEL relief for these items. If you have any questions, please contact the FAA’s New Implementation Branch at 202-267-8166 .

Flying Light
Although similar in appearance to their standard airworthiness certificate-toting siblings, light-sport aircraft (LSA) often handle much differently than what you might be used to. If LSA flying is in your near future, it’s a good idea to get some knowledge on the differences. In his feature article, “Flying Light,” author William Dubois provides important insight and relays some of his own personal experiences with LSA that you may find helpful. You can read the article at adobe.ly/2DboGSj or download the entire issue at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB.

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing.
Address questions or comments to: [email protected].
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief.

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US