News

FAAST Blast — Week of May 14, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 05/18/2018 - 10:11
 

FAA Safety Team | Safer Skies Through Education

FAAST Blast — FAA Safety Briefing Live, Best Glide Speed, AMT ACS Draft Now Available, Fresh Approach to Improving Runway Safety
Notice Number: NOTC7782

FAAST Blast — Week of May 14, 2018 – May 20, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

Watch FAA Safety Briefing Live
Did you miss the FAA Safety Briefing Live broadcast last week? No worries. Just go to http://www.faasafetybriefing.com/May-June.html to view an archived version of the broadcast. This edition introduces the May/June 2018 “Partnering with PEGASAS” issue, highlighting the FAA’s General Aviation Center of Excellence. You can also earn WINGS credit by completing a quiz after viewing the presentation. Just click the “Earn WINGS Credit” button in the presentation window.

Best Glide Speed and Distance
The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) has determined that a significant number of general aviation fatalities could be avoided if pilots were better informed and trained in determining and flying their aircraft at the best glide speed while maneuvering to complete a forced landing. Learn more about best glide speed by downloading our #FlySafe fact sheet here: http://bit.ly/2rfMV9p.

AMT Airman Certification Standards Draft Document Now Available
The FAA is in the process of replacing the Aviation Mechanic General, Airframe, and Powerplant Practical Test Standards (PTS) with a single, more comprehensive, Aviation Maintenance Technician (AMT) Airman Certification Standards (ACS) document. The ACS will help provide a single set of standards for the AMT knowledge, oral, and practical tests and help applicants understand what they will need to know, consider, and do to earn an AMT certificate with Airframe and Powerplant ratings. A draft of the new AMT ACS is available at www.faa.gov/training_testing/testing/acs/media/amt_acs.pdf. Please provide comments to afs630comments@faa.gov by May 31, 2018. The final version of the AMT ACS is expected to be effective June 2020.

Taking a Fresh Approach to Improving Runway Surfaces and Safety

The FAA and PEGASAS, the FAA’s General Aviation Center of Excellence, are exploring innovative and economical ways to improve our runway surfaces and safety. This partnership has researched ways to re-purpose safety features from other industries for use in aviation. Take for example rumble strips — we use them on our roadways, why not at our airports? To find out more about these fresh approaches to runway surface improvements and safety, check out the article, “Remote Sensors? Rumble Strips? Heated Pavements? Oh My!” in the March/April 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version at https://adobe.ly/2w8uYPE.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

 

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of April 30, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 05/04/2018 - 11:11

FAAST Blast — FAA Safety Briefing Live, Best Glide Speed, NTSB LOC Roundtable, New PEGASUS Issue of Safety Briefing
Notice Number: NOTC7757

FAAST Blast — Week of April 30, 2018 – May 06, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

Watch FAA Safety Briefing Live!
The next FAA Safety Briefing Live is coming your way starting at 1900 CT on Monday, May 07, 2018. The live-streaming broadcast will introduce the May/June 2018 “Partnering with PEGASAS” issue, highlighting the FAA’s General Aviation Center of Excellence. For more details on how to access this presentation, go to https://www.faasafety.gov/SPANS/event_details.aspx?eid=82666. To earn WINGS credit for viewing the presentation, please click the “Earn WINGS Credit” button from within the presentation window.

Best Glide Speed
The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) has determined that a significant number of general aviation fatalities could be avoided if pilots were better informed and trained in determining and flying their aircraft at the best glide speed while maneuvering to complete a forced landing. #FlySafe and download our fact sheet at http://bit.ly/2rfMV9p for more info. You can also watch a video of the presentation at: https://youtu.be/dzK5xTAe2Z0.

NTSB Hosts Roundtable on Preventing Loss of Control

On April 24, the NTSB hosted an important roundtable discussion on ways to prevent loss of control accidents in GA. Attendees included several experts from the FAA, industry and academia who focused primarily on the role of training and technology in keeping GA safe. A webcast archive of the event is available for viewing for the next three months at http://ntsb.capitolconnection.org/.

Partnering with PEGASAS

The May/June 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on the FAA’s Center of Excellence for general aviation research, the Partnership for Enhancing General Aviation Safety, Accessibility, and Sustainability (PEGASAS). This partnership facilitates collaboration and coordination between government, academia, and industry to advance aviation technologies and expand FAA research capabilities. Feature articles in this issue focus on several of these forward thinking and safety enhancing projects. For a good primer on what PEGASAS is and how it operates, check out the article “Let it Flow! PEGASAS Inspires a River of Research.” Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version of the article at https://adobe.ly/2w40YED.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of April 30, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 05/04/2018 - 11:11

FAAST Blast — FAA Safety Briefing Live, Best Glide Speed, NTSB LOC Roundtable, New PEGASUS Issue of Safety Briefing
Notice Number: NOTC7757

FAAST Blast — Week of April 30, 2018 – May 06, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

Watch FAA Safety Briefing Live!
The next FAA Safety Briefing Live is coming your way starting at 1900 CT on Monday, May 07, 2018. The live-streaming broadcast will introduce the May/June 2018 “Partnering with PEGASAS” issue, highlighting the FAA’s General Aviation Center of Excellence. For more details on how to access this presentation, go to https://www.faasafety.gov/SPANS/event_details.aspx?eid=82666. To earn WINGS credit for viewing the presentation, please click the “Earn WINGS Credit” button from within the presentation window.

Best Glide Speed
The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) has determined that a significant number of general aviation fatalities could be avoided if pilots were better informed and trained in determining and flying their aircraft at the best glide speed while maneuvering to complete a forced landing. #FlySafe and download our fact sheet at http://bit.ly/2rfMV9p for more info. You can also watch a video of the presentation at: https://youtu.be/dzK5xTAe2Z0.

NTSB Hosts Roundtable on Preventing Loss of Control

On April 24, the NTSB hosted an important roundtable discussion on ways to prevent loss of control accidents in GA. Attendees included several experts from the FAA, industry and academia who focused primarily on the role of training and technology in keeping GA safe. A webcast archive of the event is available for viewing for the next three months at http://ntsb.capitolconnection.org/.

Partnering with PEGASAS

The May/June 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on the FAA’s Center of Excellence for general aviation research, the Partnership for Enhancing General Aviation Safety, Accessibility, and Sustainability (PEGASAS). This partnership facilitates collaboration and coordination between government, academia, and industry to advance aviation technologies and expand FAA research capabilities. Feature articles in this issue focus on several of these forward thinking and safety enhancing projects. For a good primer on what PEGASAS is and how it operates, check out the article “Let it Flow! PEGASAS Inspires a River of Research.” Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version of the article at https://adobe.ly/2w40YED.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAA Safety Briefing May/June 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 05/03/2018 - 14:41
 

Your source for general aviation news and information

Read the Latest Issue!

The May/June 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on the FAA’s Center of Excellence for general aviation research, the Partnership for Enhancing General Aviation Safety, Accessibility, and Sustainability (PEGASAS). This partnership facilitates collaboration and coordination between government, academia, and industry to advance aviation technologies and expand FAA research capabilities. Feature articles in this issue focus on several of these forward thinking and safety enhancing projects.

Feature Stories

Click on headline below to read each mobile-friendly article online.

  Let it Flow! PEGASAS Inspires a River of Research

 

  Pushing the Envelope A Plan of “Attack” for Loss of Control

 

  Weather … Or Not? Weather Technology in the Cockpit

 

  LED There Be Light Working to Enhance Airport Lighting

 

  Remote Sensors? Rumble Strips? Heated Pavements? Oh My! 3 Fresh Approaches to Improve Runway Surfaces and Safety

 

  How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Singularity Using Collective Data to Drive Safety Improvement   Download Entire Magazine

PDF  |  EPUB  (for e-readers) |  MOBI (for Kindle)

 

Scroll up to the "Feature Stories" section to open each feature article in an easy-to-read online format.

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAA Safety Briefing May/June 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 05/03/2018 - 14:41
 

Your source for general aviation news and information

Read the Latest Issue!

The May/June 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on the FAA’s Center of Excellence for general aviation research, the Partnership for Enhancing General Aviation Safety, Accessibility, and Sustainability (PEGASAS). This partnership facilitates collaboration and coordination between government, academia, and industry to advance aviation technologies and expand FAA research capabilities. Feature articles in this issue focus on several of these forward thinking and safety enhancing projects.

Feature Stories

Click on headline below to read each mobile-friendly article online.

  Let it Flow! PEGASAS Inspires a River of Research

 

  Pushing the Envelope A Plan of “Attack” for Loss of Control

 

  Weather … Or Not? Weather Technology in the Cockpit

 

  LED There Be Light Working to Enhance Airport Lighting

 

  Remote Sensors? Rumble Strips? Heated Pavements? Oh My! 3 Fresh Approaches to Improve Runway Surfaces and Safety

 

  How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Singularity Using Collective Data to Drive Safety Improvement   Download Entire Magazine

PDF  |  EPUB  (for e-readers) |  MOBI (for Kindle)

 

Scroll up to the "Feature Stories" section to open each feature article in an easy-to-read online format.

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAA allows pilots to conduct PA–28 fuel selector inspections

AskBob News - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 10:57

From AOPA News

The FAA has published a final rule that supersedes an airworthiness directive (AD) issued in January, and will allow owners of many Piper PA–28-series airplanes who hold at least a private pilot certificate to inspect their aircraft fuel-tank selector cover placards for proper positioning.

The new AD’s terms reflect the FAA’s consideration of AOPA's comments, and could save aircraft owners and pilots more than $763,000 in labor costs for the inspections, fleet-wide.

 

Since the AD was issued Jan. 23, its compliance deadline has been pushed back three times in response to successive alternative method of compliance (AMOC) requests from AOPA—first to allow for public comments to be reviewed, and now, to cover the time interval until the updated AD’s April 20 effective date.

 

Aircraft owners who elect to use AOPA’s global AMOC must first notify their appropriate principal inspector or manager of the local flight standards district office. After the AD’s April 20 effective date, aircraft owners can perform the initial inspection.

The AD arose “from a quality control issue that resulted in the installation of fuel tank selector covers with the placement of the left and right fuel tank selector placards installed in reverse,” according to the document, which adds that “the unsafe condition, if not addressed, could result in fuel starvation and loss of engine power in flight.”

AOPA’s comments noted that “we are unware of any accidents or incidents that have occurred as a result of improper placards. Many of the affected fleet have been in operation for decades and the owner/operator has likely verified the accuracy of the fuel selector and corresponding tank through fuel gauge readings over hundreds, if not thousands of hours.”

In its favorable response, the FAA noted that since it issued the AD, “we have determined that the owner/operator (pilot) holding at least a private pilot certificate will be allowed to perform the preflight check of the fuel tank selector placards.”

The inspection check must be entered into the airplane records to show compliance with the AD. If the inspection reveals that the placards are not properly installed, a temporary placard must be installed before further flight, with a permanent corrected placard replacement accomplished within the next 100 hours time-in-service.

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Categories: News, US

FAA allows pilots to conduct PA–28 fuel selector inspections

AskBob News - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 10:57

From AOPA News

The FAA has published a final rule that supersedes an airworthiness directive (AD) issued in January, and will allow owners of many Piper PA–28-series airplanes who hold at least a private pilot certificate to inspect their aircraft fuel-tank selector cover placards for proper positioning.

The new AD’s terms reflect the FAA’s consideration of AOPA's comments, and could save aircraft owners and pilots more than $763,000 in labor costs for the inspections, fleet-wide.

 

Since the AD was issued Jan. 23, its compliance deadline has been pushed back three times in response to successive alternative method of compliance (AMOC) requests from AOPA—first to allow for public comments to be reviewed, and now, to cover the time interval until the updated AD’s April 20 effective date.

 

Aircraft owners who elect to use AOPA’s global AMOC must first notify their appropriate principal inspector or manager of the local flight standards district office. After the AD’s April 20 effective date, aircraft owners can perform the initial inspection.

The AD arose “from a quality control issue that resulted in the installation of fuel tank selector covers with the placement of the left and right fuel tank selector placards installed in reverse,” according to the document, which adds that “the unsafe condition, if not addressed, could result in fuel starvation and loss of engine power in flight.”

AOPA’s comments noted that “we are unware of any accidents or incidents that have occurred as a result of improper placards. Many of the affected fleet have been in operation for decades and the owner/operator has likely verified the accuracy of the fuel selector and corresponding tank through fuel gauge readings over hundreds, if not thousands of hours.”

In its favorable response, the FAA noted that since it issued the AD, “we have determined that the owner/operator (pilot) holding at least a private pilot certificate will be allowed to perform the preflight check of the fuel tank selector placards.”

The inspection check must be entered into the airplane records to show compliance with the AD. If the inspection reveals that the placards are not properly installed, a temporary placard must be installed before further flight, with a permanent corrected placard replacement accomplished within the next 100 hours time-in-service.

Categories: News, US

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 04/05/2018 - 11:38

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm
Notice Number: NOTC7704

 

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm

We have a sense of humor, too, but an April Fool’s joke that the Federal Aviation Administration is extending the ADS-B deadline is just that.

As stated in the final rule published with industry input in May 2010, all aircraft flying in designated controlled airspace – generally the same busy airspace where transponders are currently required – must be equipped with ADS-B Out avionics by Jan. 1, 2020. Only aircraft that fly in uncontrolled airspace, and aircraft without electrical systems, such as balloons and gliders, are exempt from the mandate.

Those who have already equipped understand that ADS-B is transforming the nation’s airspace by providing more precision and reliability than the current radar system, enhancing safety and increasing situational awareness.

Time is running out. There are only 21 months left until the deadline. If you have any questions about equipage – whether you need to or not, what equipment to get, etc. – please see the FAA’s Equip ADS-B website. For information about the transformational technology, visit the ADS-B website.

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 04/05/2018 - 11:38

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm
Notice Number: NOTC7704

 

No Kidding: ADS-B Deadline of Jan. 1, 2020, is Firm

We have a sense of humor, too, but an April Fool’s joke that the Federal Aviation Administration is extending the ADS-B deadline is just that.

As stated in the final rule published with industry input in May 2010, all aircraft flying in designated controlled airspace – generally the same busy airspace where transponders are currently required – must be equipped with ADS-B Out avionics by Jan. 1, 2020. Only aircraft that fly in uncontrolled airspace, and aircraft without electrical systems, such as balloons and gliders, are exempt from the mandate.

Those who have already equipped understand that ADS-B is transforming the nation’s airspace by providing more precision and reliability than the current radar system, enhancing safety and increasing situational awareness.

Time is running out. There are only 21 months left until the deadline. If you have any questions about equipage – whether you need to or not, what equipment to get, etc. – please see the FAA’s Equip ADS-B website. For information about the transformational technology, visit the ADS-B website.

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of April 2, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 15:58

FAAST Blast — AD Issued for Certain Bonanzas, Sun ‘n Fun 2018, How to Be a Weather Wingman
Notice Number: NOTC7703

FAAST Blast — Week of April 2, 2018 – April 8, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

FAA Issues AD for Certain Bonanza Airplanes
The FAA last week issued an AD for certain Textron Aviation A36TC, B36TC, S35, V35, V35A, and V35B airplanes. AD 2018-06-11 adds a life limit to the exhaust tailpipe v-band coupling (clamp) that attaches the exhaust tailpipe to the turbocharger and requires an annual visual inspection. The AD, which is effective May 3, 2018, affects 731 airplanes of U.S. registry. For more details, go to go.usa.gov/xQgfr

Sun ‘n Fun 2018
Get ready for some fun in the sun aviation style at this year’s Sun ’n Fun International Fly-In and Expo, scheduled to take place April 10-15, 2018, in Lakeland, Fla. The event features aerial performances, exhibits, and a wide variety of educational seminars (visit bit.ly/SnF18 for more information).

The FAA will also host a series of safety forums between 8:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. each day at the FAA Safety Team’s National Resource Center. NTSB Board Member Dr. Earl Weener will speak about loss of control accidents and the FAA’s General Aviation and Commercial Division Manager, Brad Palmer, will discuss the agency’s efforts to enhance GA safety. Other forum topics include wilderness survival, BasicMed, UAS regulations, and ADS-B equipage. For updates to the safety forum schedule, go to go.usa.gov/x9MZq. And if you’re planning to fly to Sun ’n Fun, don’t forget to read the 2018 Sun ’n Fun Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) available here or go to faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/notices.

How to Be a Weather Wingman

Pilots: What if we told you that you could help be a good cockpit companion even when you’re not in the same plane? Better yet, how about if you had the power to potentially help save a fellow pilot’s life — maybe several pilots — with a simple click of the mic? Find out how by reading the article “How to Be a Weather Wingman — Pay It Forward with PIREPs” in the March/April 2018 flying companion-themed issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version of this article at https://adobe.ly/2FBn459.  

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of April 2, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Wed, 04/04/2018 - 15:58

FAAST Blast — AD Issued for Certain Bonanzas, Sun ‘n Fun 2018, How to Be a Weather Wingman
Notice Number: NOTC7703

FAAST Blast — Week of April 2, 2018 – April 8, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

FAA Issues AD for Certain Bonanza Airplanes
The FAA last week issued an AD for certain Textron Aviation A36TC, B36TC, S35, V35, V35A, and V35B airplanes. AD 2018-06-11 adds a life limit to the exhaust tailpipe v-band coupling (clamp) that attaches the exhaust tailpipe to the turbocharger and requires an annual visual inspection. The AD, which is effective May 3, 2018, affects 731 airplanes of U.S. registry. For more details, go to go.usa.gov/xQgfr

Sun ‘n Fun 2018
Get ready for some fun in the sun aviation style at this year’s Sun ’n Fun International Fly-In and Expo, scheduled to take place April 10-15, 2018, in Lakeland, Fla. The event features aerial performances, exhibits, and a wide variety of educational seminars (visit bit.ly/SnF18 for more information).

The FAA will also host a series of safety forums between 8:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. each day at the FAA Safety Team’s National Resource Center. NTSB Board Member Dr. Earl Weener will speak about loss of control accidents and the FAA’s General Aviation and Commercial Division Manager, Brad Palmer, will discuss the agency’s efforts to enhance GA safety. Other forum topics include wilderness survival, BasicMed, UAS regulations, and ADS-B equipage. For updates to the safety forum schedule, go to go.usa.gov/x9MZq. And if you’re planning to fly to Sun ’n Fun, don’t forget to read the 2018 Sun ’n Fun Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) available here or go to faa.gov/air_traffic/publications/notices.

How to Be a Weather Wingman

Pilots: What if we told you that you could help be a good cockpit companion even when you’re not in the same plane? Better yet, how about if you had the power to potentially help save a fellow pilot’s life — maybe several pilots — with a simple click of the mic? Find out how by reading the article “How to Be a Weather Wingman — Pay It Forward with PIREPs” in the March/April 2018 flying companion-themed issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can also read a mobile-friendly version of this article at https://adobe.ly/2FBn459.  

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of Mar 5, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 03/08/2018 - 09:45

FAAST Blast — LAANC Program Expanded, New Safety Briefing Live Broadcast Coming Soon, GA Survey, Flying Companions Issue
Notice Number: NOTC7656

FAAST Blast — Week of Mar 5, 2018 – Mar 11, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update
 

FAA Expands Drone Airspace Authorization Program
The FAA is expanding tests of an automated system that will ultimately provide near real-time processing of airspace authorization requests for unmanned aircraft (UAS) operators nationwide.

Under the FAA’s Part 107 small drone rule, operators must secure approval from the agency to operate in any airspace controlled by an air traffic facility. To facilitate those approvals, the agency deployed the prototype Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC) at several air traffic facilities last November to evaluate the feasibility of a fully automated solution enabled by data sharing. Based on the prototype’s success, the agency will now conduct a nationwide beta test beginning April 30 that will deploy LAANC incrementally at nearly 300 air traffic facilities covering approximately 500 airports. The final deployment will begin on September 13. For more information, read the FAA news release here: www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=89845.

Announcing New FAA Safety Briefing Live Broadcast

Mark your calendars now for FAA Safety Briefing Live, which is coming your way starting at 1900 CT on Monday, March 12, 2018. The inaugural, streaming broadcast will introduce the March/April 2018 “GA Flying Companions” issue, and include interviews with several special guests. It will also be eligible for WINGS credit. For more details on how to access this presentation, go to www.faasafety.gov/SPANS/event_details.aspx?eid=81571.

The GA and Part 135 Survey Has Been Cleared for Takeoff

Did you receive an email or postcard invitation asking you to complete the survey for your aircraft? The survey takes only 10-15 minutes and helps the FAA improve general aviation infrastructure and safety. Please complete the survey today online at www.aviationsurvey.org or contact us at 1-800-826-1797 or infoaviationsurvey@tetratech.com.

Flying Companions

The March/April 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on Flying Companions. Building on our previous companion-based edition in 2014, this issue is specifically designed for the friends and loved ones who join us in the air or might have an interest in doing so. Feature articles help regular or prospective passengers gain a better understanding of the world of general aviation and offer the tips, techniques, and resources needed to take a more active role during flight. Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of Mar 5, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 03/08/2018 - 09:45

FAAST Blast — LAANC Program Expanded, New Safety Briefing Live Broadcast Coming Soon, GA Survey, Flying Companions Issue
Notice Number: NOTC7656

FAAST Blast — Week of Mar 5, 2018 – Mar 11, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update
 

FAA Expands Drone Airspace Authorization Program
The FAA is expanding tests of an automated system that will ultimately provide near real-time processing of airspace authorization requests for unmanned aircraft (UAS) operators nationwide.

Under the FAA’s Part 107 small drone rule, operators must secure approval from the agency to operate in any airspace controlled by an air traffic facility. To facilitate those approvals, the agency deployed the prototype Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability (LAANC) at several air traffic facilities last November to evaluate the feasibility of a fully automated solution enabled by data sharing. Based on the prototype’s success, the agency will now conduct a nationwide beta test beginning April 30 that will deploy LAANC incrementally at nearly 300 air traffic facilities covering approximately 500 airports. The final deployment will begin on September 13. For more information, read the FAA news release here: www.faa.gov/news/updates/?newsId=89845.

Announcing New FAA Safety Briefing Live Broadcast

Mark your calendars now for FAA Safety Briefing Live, which is coming your way starting at 1900 CT on Monday, March 12, 2018. The inaugural, streaming broadcast will introduce the March/April 2018 “GA Flying Companions” issue, and include interviews with several special guests. It will also be eligible for WINGS credit. For more details on how to access this presentation, go to www.faasafety.gov/SPANS/event_details.aspx?eid=81571.

The GA and Part 135 Survey Has Been Cleared for Takeoff

Did you receive an email or postcard invitation asking you to complete the survey for your aircraft? The survey takes only 10-15 minutes and helps the FAA improve general aviation infrastructure and safety. Please complete the survey today online at www.aviationsurvey.org or contact us at 1-800-826-1797 or infoaviationsurvey@tetratech.com.

Flying Companions

The March/April 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing focuses on Flying Companions. Building on our previous companion-based edition in 2014, this issue is specifically designed for the friends and loved ones who join us in the air or might have an interest in doing so. Feature articles help regular or prospective passengers gain a better understanding of the world of general aviation and offer the tips, techniques, and resources needed to take a more active role during flight. Download your copy or read online at 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

It’s Official: Rotorcraft Pilot and Mechanic Shortage Verified

AskBob News - Thu, 03/01/2018 - 13:04

The results of a study forecasting the U.S. supply of rotorcraft pilots and mechanics over the next 18 years has been released, confirming what many in our industry suspected. Unless there are some fundamental changes in policy, outreach, scholarships, and access to financing, the helicopter industry faces large-scale deficits in the amount of available and qualified licensed and certificated pilots and mechanics.

 

The study projects a shortage of 7,469 helicopter pilots in the United States between 2018 and 2036. For maintenance technicians, the numbers are even more concerning. Our industry is projected to be short 40,613 certificated aviation mechanics in the United States between 2018 and 2036.

 

The study results, commissioned by Helicopter Foundation International (HFI) and conducted by the University of North Dakota (UND), were released today, Feb. 28, at a press conference at HAI HELI-EXPO 2018 in Las Vegas. Allison McKay, HFI vice president, introduced the study, and two UND researchers, Dr. Elizabeth Bjerke and Kent W. Lovelace, reported the results. Recognizing the importance of this information, HFI is making available both the study results and an executive summary.

 

In addition to documenting the projected shortage, the study gathered information on how it is already changing operations. For example, more than 50 percent of surveyed operators said that the shortage of pilots and mechanics would definitely or probably interfere with their operation’s ability to grow over the next five years. Regional airlines are actively recruiting helicopter pilots — more than 500 transferred to fixed-wing operations in 2017 alone.

 

This shortage is an industry-wide problem, and fixing it will require efforts from many sectors, including government, industry, military, finance, insurance, and education. In the coming months, HFI and Helicopter Association International (HAI) will be recruiting stakeholders to collaboratively work on defining concrete next steps to combat the problem. If you would be interested in participating in this effort, please contact Allison McKay.

 

"Our industry needs to take a hard look at how we do things,” says Matt Zuccaro, HAI president and CEO. “We really don’t have a choice. These numbers show a future where the growth of our industry will be curtailed because operators won’t have the workforce they need. But we have the option to change that future by acting proactively now to recruit the next generation of pilots and maintainers.”

 

HFI Vice President McKay agrees. “The study results are certainly bad news for our industry. But the good news is that now we know the numbers — and now we can take steps to ensure the sustainability of our industry.”

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Categories: News, US

It’s Official: Rotorcraft Pilot and Mechanic Shortage Verified

AskBob News - Thu, 03/01/2018 - 13:04

The results of a study forecasting the U.S. supply of rotorcraft pilots and mechanics over the next 18 years has been released, confirming what many in our industry suspected. Unless there are some fundamental changes in policy, outreach, scholarships, and access to financing, the helicopter industry faces large-scale deficits in the amount of available and qualified licensed and certificated pilots and mechanics.

 

The study projects a shortage of 7,469 helicopter pilots in the United States between 2018 and 2036. For maintenance technicians, the numbers are even more concerning. Our industry is projected to be short 40,613 certificated aviation mechanics in the United States between 2018 and 2036.

 

The study results, commissioned by Helicopter Foundation International (HFI) and conducted by the University of North Dakota (UND), were released today, Feb. 28, at a press conference at HAI HELI-EXPO 2018 in Las Vegas. Allison McKay, HFI vice president, introduced the study, and two UND researchers, Dr. Elizabeth Bjerke and Kent W. Lovelace, reported the results. Recognizing the importance of this information, HFI is making available both the study results and an executive summary.

 

In addition to documenting the projected shortage, the study gathered information on how it is already changing operations. For example, more than 50 percent of surveyed operators said that the shortage of pilots and mechanics would definitely or probably interfere with their operation’s ability to grow over the next five years. Regional airlines are actively recruiting helicopter pilots — more than 500 transferred to fixed-wing operations in 2017 alone.

 

This shortage is an industry-wide problem, and fixing it will require efforts from many sectors, including government, industry, military, finance, insurance, and education. In the coming months, HFI and Helicopter Association International (HAI) will be recruiting stakeholders to collaboratively work on defining concrete next steps to combat the problem. If you would be interested in participating in this effort, please contact Allison McKay.

 

"Our industry needs to take a hard look at how we do things,” says Matt Zuccaro, HAI president and CEO. “We really don’t have a choice. These numbers show a future where the growth of our industry will be curtailed because operators won’t have the workforce they need. But we have the option to change that future by acting proactively now to recruit the next generation of pilots and maintainers.”

 

HFI Vice President McKay agrees. “The study results are certainly bad news for our industry. But the good news is that now we know the numbers — and now we can take steps to ensure the sustainability of our industry.”

Categories: News, US

EASA Reconsiders Part-Tagging For Repairs Subject To EU-U.S. Bilateral

AskBob News - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 09:28

MRO-Network

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) released a long-awaited notice of proposed amendment (NPA) that would relieve parts documentation requirements imposed on EASA-certificated, U.S.-based repair stations through the U.S.-EU bilateral agreement’s Maintenance Annex Guidance (MAG).

The MAG essentially requires an EASA Form 1 equivalent (i.e., an FAA Form 8130-3) for new parts, creating what industry deems an impossible situation since production approval holders (PAH) are not required to provide the document under FAA regulations. Previous efforts to persuade the European authority to recognize equivalent evidence of airworthiness fell flat.

Industry is particularly embattled by the regulation’s applicability to commercial parts—which are often produced and sold for nonaviation use in the U.S., and therefore sans the required 8130-3—further exacerbating an already tenuous situation.

In August 2016, the FAA published Notice 8900.380, providing an alternative path to compliance if the required

documentation cannot be obtained from the PAH. The notice confirmed a repair station’s privilege to inspect and approve a new part for return to service when it is not accompanied by Form 8130-3, so long as the repair station establishes traceability. The notice’s one-year expiration date was extended to August 2018 while the authorities endeavor to get the language incorporated into MAG Change 7.

Read More

 

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Categories: News, US

EASA Reconsiders Part-Tagging For Repairs Subject To EU-U.S. Bilateral

AskBob News - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 09:28

MRO-Network

The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) released a long-awaited notice of proposed amendment (NPA) that would relieve parts documentation requirements imposed on EASA-certificated, U.S.-based repair stations through the U.S.-EU bilateral agreement’s Maintenance Annex Guidance (MAG).

The MAG essentially requires an EASA Form 1 equivalent (i.e., an FAA Form 8130-3) for new parts, creating what industry deems an impossible situation since production approval holders (PAH) are not required to provide the document under FAA regulations. Previous efforts to persuade the European authority to recognize equivalent evidence of airworthiness fell flat.

Industry is particularly embattled by the regulation’s applicability to commercial parts—which are often produced and sold for nonaviation use in the U.S., and therefore sans the required 8130-3—further exacerbating an already tenuous situation.

In August 2016, the FAA published Notice 8900.380, providing an alternative path to compliance if the required

documentation cannot be obtained from the PAH. The notice confirmed a repair station’s privilege to inspect and approve a new part for return to service when it is not accompanied by Form 8130-3, so long as the repair station establishes traceability. The notice’s one-year expiration date was extended to August 2018 while the authorities endeavor to get the language incorporated into MAG Change 7.

Read More

 

Categories: News, US

What's In A Name? Alodine

AskBob News - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 09:20

MRO-Network

Earlier this month, FAA sent out a Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) clarifying that operators and MRO providers that rely on Alodine,a corrosion-protection and primer for certain metals, can safely use Bonderite for the same applications.

Both Alodine and Bonderite are made by Henkel. In fact, they are one and the same. Bonderite is simply the new brand name for Alodine. Aside from looping in the end-users—Henkel notes that Bonderite as "known as Alodine"—why did FAA take the step of issuing an SAIB? Because it has a number of regulatory-binding documents that call out Alodine specifically.

"The FAA has issued many [airworthiness directives (ADs)] and [alternative means of compliance, or AMOCs] that specifically call out for application of Alodine," the agency notes in the bulletin. "The unavailability of Alodine will make it difficult to comply with ADs or previously approved AMOCs that require the application of Alodine."

Such is the power of FAA's regulations—and the challenge

presented when the agency gets too specific in the rules that govern U.S. aviation.

 

In an ideal world, FAA's regulations set the basic parameters, and its guidance provides more specific guidelines on how the rules can be followed. When the rules get too specific, industry can be hamstrung, because it's much harder to change a regulation than to issue new guidance.

“The FAA should learn from this,” said Aeronautical Repair Station Association (ARSA) executive director Sarah MacLeod. “When it calls out specific materials in a law, such as an airworthiness directive, a simple marketing change made by a company producing those materials can require bureaucratic backflips. This [new AMOC] is a fine fix, but the government needs to be more circumspect in proscriptive rulemaking.”

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Categories: News, US

What's In A Name? Alodine

AskBob News - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 09:20

MRO-Network

Earlier this month, FAA sent out a Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) clarifying that operators and MRO providers that rely on Alodine,a corrosion-protection and primer for certain metals, can safely use Bonderite for the same applications.

Both Alodine and Bonderite are made by Henkel. In fact, they are one and the same. Bonderite is simply the new brand name for Alodine. Aside from looping in the end-users—Henkel notes that Bonderite as "known as Alodine"—why did FAA take the step of issuing an SAIB? Because it has a number of regulatory-binding documents that call out Alodine specifically.

"The FAA has issued many [airworthiness directives (ADs)] and [alternative means of compliance, or AMOCs] that specifically call out for application of Alodine," the agency notes in the bulletin. "The unavailability of Alodine will make it difficult to comply with ADs or previously approved AMOCs that require the application of Alodine."

Such is the power of FAA's regulations—and the challenge

presented when the agency gets too specific in the rules that govern U.S. aviation.

 

In an ideal world, FAA's regulations set the basic parameters, and its guidance provides more specific guidelines on how the rules can be followed. When the rules get too specific, industry can be hamstrung, because it's much harder to change a regulation than to issue new guidance.

“The FAA should learn from this,” said Aeronautical Repair Station Association (ARSA) executive director Sarah MacLeod. “When it calls out specific materials in a law, such as an airworthiness directive, a simple marketing change made by a company producing those materials can require bureaucratic backflips. This [new AMOC] is a fine fix, but the government needs to be more circumspect in proscriptive rulemaking.”

Categories: News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of Feb. 05, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 02/09/2018 - 09:52

FAAST Blast – NPRM Issued for Textron Airplanes, Maintenance Placards, How to Talk Like a Pilot
Notice Number: NOTC7607

FAAST Blast — Week of Feb. 05, 2018 – Feb. 11, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update
 

NPRM Issued for Textron Aviation Airplanes

The FAA last week proposed to issue a new airworthiness directive (AD) that would affect certain (Cessna) Textron Aviation 172/182/206/207/210 airplanes. A report of cracks found in the lower area of the forward cabin doorpost bulkhead prompted this notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). This condition is determined to be the result of metal fatigue. If not addressed, it could lead to failure of the wing in operation, which could result in loss of control.

The AD would require repetitive inspection of this area for cracks and would require owners to make any necessary repairs in accordance with the applicable Cessna service kit. The FAA estimates that this proposed AD affects 14,653 airplanes of U.S. registry. For more details on the inspection and repair requirements of this NPRM, as well as instruction for submitting comments, go to https://go.usa.gov/xnsEA. The comment period closes on March 19, 2018.

Maintenance Placards

The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) has identified that attempting to fly in an aircraft currently undergoing maintenance, and not yet returned to service, is a causal factor in a number of fatal GA accidents. This month’s #FlySafe topic suggests adopting informal lock out/tag out procedures to ensure pilots are aware of un-airworthy aircraft conditions. See the fact sheet here: https://go.usa.gov/xnsPN.

How to Talk Like a Pilot

Pilots: How would you rate your aviation communication skills? Are you precise, yet concise? Courteous and classy? For important tips and techniques to improve your aviation lingo, have a look at the article, “How to Talk Like a Pilot” in the Jan/Feb 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at: 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can view a mobile-friendly version of this article at https://adobe.ly/2p7KwQb.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US